Undergraduate

PS 1 Introductory Physics I, lecture (3 units)

This is a natural science course that introduces conceptual physics to non-science majors. Its main objective is to establish Physics as the foundation of all other sciences and engineering. Specific objectives of the course include: (1) introducing the scientific method, (2) conveying the concepts of physical phenomena with a minimum of mathematics and formulae, and (3) highlighting the dependence of all science and engineering disciplines on physics. The instruction in this course is a combination of lecture with classroom demonstrations of physical phenomena, audio-visual presentations, and self-paced library research assignments. Topics covered include mechanics, matter and atomic structure, heat and thermodynamics, wave mechanics (sound and light), electromagnetics, and modern physics.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

Bolemon, Jay, Physics-A Window on our World 3rd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1995.
Freedman & Young, University Physics 9th Ed., Addison-Wesley, 1996.
Hewitt, P., Conceptual Physics 8th Ed., Harper Collins, 1997.
Ps 2 Laboratory Manual, Physics Department, 1997.
Resnick, Halliday, & Walker, Physics 4th Ed., Wiley, 1995.

PS 2 Introductory Physics I, laboratory (1 unit)

This is a laboratory course that is taken concurrently with PS 1. The main objective of this course is to develop skills through a series of activities that reveal physical laws and phenomena. Through actual experimentation, it is expected that students will be able to enhance their analytical skills and maximize their use of the scientific method. Laboratory activities include standard experiments and computer-aided data acquisition and analysis. Experiments performed complement lecture topics covered in PS 1.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:
Bolemon, Jay, Physics-A Window on our World 3rd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1995.
Freedman & Young, University Physics 9th Ed., Addison-Wesley, 1996.
Hewitt, Paul, Conceptual Physics 8th Ed., Harper Collins, 1997.
Ps 2 Laboratory Manual, Physics Department, 1997.
Resnick, Halliday & Walker. Physics 4th Ed., Wiley, 1995.

PS 10 Introductory Physics (5 units)

This course involves lectures with demonstrations, recitations and laboratory. It is a natural science course introducing physics concepts to the students.
Prerequisite: none
Bibliography:
Alonso & Finn, Physics Revised Ed., Addison-Wesley, 1996.
Beiser, Arthur, Physics 5th Ed., Addison-Wesley, 1991.
Ellis & Tang, Trends in Theoretical Physics. Addison-Wesley, 1990.
Giancoli, Douglas C., Physics 5th Ed., Prentice Hall, 1998.
Hewitt, Paul, Conceptual Physics 8th Ed., Harper Collins, 1998.

PS 11 General Physics I: Mechanics and Heat (4 units)

This course involves lectures with demonstrations, recitations and laboratory covering mechanics and thermodynamics. Together with Ps 12, they provide an 8-unit, one-year course dealing with experimental results and fundamental theories in the various fields of physics. This is open for students who have not taken a formal course in calculus and not to majors in physics, chemistry, mathematics and engineering.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:
Alonso & Finn, Physics Revised Ed., Addison-Wesley, 1996.
Beiser, Arthur, Physics 5th Ed., Addison-Wesley, 1991.
Ellis & Tang, Trends in Theoretical Physics, Addison-Wesley, 1990.
Giancoli, Douglas C., Physics 5th Ed., Prentice Hall, 1998.
Halliday, Walker & Resnick, Fundamentals of Physics, 1997.
Mansfield & O’Sullivan, Fundamentals of Physics, 1998.

PS 12 General Physics II: Sound, Electricity, Magnetism and Light (4 units)
This course involves lectures with demonstrations, recitations and laboratory covering topics such as waves, sounds, electricity, magnetism and optics. It may also extend to selected topics in modern physics.

Prerequisite: PS 11 or consent of instructor

Bibliography:

Brieche & Wallach, Technical Physics 4th Ed., 1990.
Cutnell & Johnson, Physics 4th Ed., 1998.
Falk, Brell & Stork, Seeing Light: Optics in Nature, Photography, Color Vision and Holography, 1990.
Kueni, R.G., Light & Color, An Introduction, Dystar, Inc., 1996.
Sokoloff, Laws & Thorton, Real Time Physics, 1998.

PS 14 General Physics, lecture (5 units)

A service course directed to Physics in the Life Sciences and/or Engineering. This course provides a general conceptual introduction to all topics in Physics as well as providing the mathematical framework required by the discipline without calculus. It may be taught with emphasis on topics and needs of particular service disciplines. 5-units – 5 hours per week.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

Bueche & Jerde, Principles of Physics 6th Ed., McGraw Hill, 1995.
Giancoli, Douglas C., Physics 5th Ed., Prentice Hall, 1998.
Kane & Sternheim, Physics for the Life Sciences, McGraw Hill, 1991.
Marion, Jerry B., General Physics with Bioscience Essays, John Wiley & Sons, 1990.
Young, Hugh D., University Physics 9th Ed., Addison-Wesley, 1995.

PS 15 General Physics, laboratory (1 unit)

This is a set of laboratory experiments and activities from mechanics to modern physics that complement the lecture material of PS 14. 1 unit – 3 hours per week.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

Bueche & Jerde, Principles of Physics 6th Ed., McGraw Hill, 1995.
Giancoli, Douglas C., Physics 5th Ed., Prentice Hall, 1998.
Kane & Sternheim, Physics for the Life Sciences, McGraw Hill, 1991.
Marion, Jerry B., General Physics with Bioscience Essays, John Wiley & Sons, 1990.
Young, Hugh D., University Physics 9th Ed., Addison-Wesley, 1995.

PS 17 Selected Topics in Analytical Physics I (5 units) (lecture & laboratory)
This course involves lectures with demonstrations, recitations and laboratory covering selected topics from the subject areas of mechanics, waves and thermodynamics. It also provides an introduction to modern physics.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

Crawford, Waves and Oscillations (Berkeley Physics Course), Vol. 3, New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1965.
Fishbane, Gasiorowicz & Thornton, Physics for Scientists and Engineers (Extended Version) 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1997.
Halliday, D. & Resnick, R., Physics, John Wiley & Sons, 1992.
Kittel, Knight & Ruderman, Mechanics (Berkeley Physics Course), Vol. 1, New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1965.
Ohanian, H., Modern Physics 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1995.
Serway, R., Moses, C. & Moyer, C., Modern Physics 2nd Ed., Saunders College Publishing, 1997.
Serway, Raymond, Physics for Scientists and Engineers 2nd Ed., Saunders.
Tipler, Physics for Scientists & Engineers, New York: Worth Publishers, 1991.
Young, Hugh D. & Freedman, Roger A., University Physics 9th Ed., Addison Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1996.

PS 18 Selected Topics in Analytical Physics II (5 units) (lecture & laboratory)

This course involves lectures with demonstrations, recitations and laboratory covering selected topics from the subject areas of electromagnetism and optics.
Prerequisite: PS 17
Bibliography:
Fishbane, Gasiorowicz & Thornton, Physics for Scientists and Engineers (Extended Version) 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1997.
Halliday, D. & Resnick, R., Physics, John Wiley & Sons, 1992.
Ohanian, H., Modern Physics 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1995.
Purcell, Edward M., Electricity and Magnetism (Berkeley Physics Course), Vol. 2, New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1965.
Serway, Raymond, Physics for Scientists and Engineers 2nd Ed., Saunders.
Young, Hugh D. & Freedman, Roger A., University Physics 9th Ed., Addison Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1996.

PS 21 College Physics I (5 units)

This is a 5-unit course consisting of a 4-unit lecture (4 hours a week) and a 1-unit laboratory (3 hours a week). This course covers physics quantities, vectors, uniformly accelerated motion, Newton’s Law, work, energy and power, momentum and collisions, rotational motion, rotational dynamics, kinetic theory of gases and the concept of temperature, oscillatory motion, wave motion, interference of waves, electrostatics, the electric field and electromagnetic waves.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

de SA, A., Electronics for Scientists, Prentice Hall, 1992.
Fishbane, Gasiorowicz & Thornton, Physics for Scientists and Engineers (Extended Version) 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1995.
Freedman & Young, University Physics 9th Ed., Reading, Massachusetts: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1996.
Halliday, David & Robert Resnick, Physics, John Wiley & Sons, 1992.
Narciso, Garcia & Arthur Damask, Physics for Computer Science Students, Springer-Verlag, 1991.
Ohanian, H.C., Modern Physics 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1995.
Tipler, Paul A., Physics, Worth Publishers, Inc., 1982.

PS 22 College Physics II (5 units)

This is a 5-unit course consisting of a 4-unit lecture (4 hours a week) and a 1-unit laboratory (3 hours a week). This course covers the following topics: the beginning of the quantum story, atomic models, fundamental principle of quantum mechanics, an introduction to the methods of quantum mechanics, quantum mechanics of atoms, crystal structures & bonding in solids, free electron, theories of solid, band theory of solids, semiconductors, semi-devices, some basic logic circuits of computers and the technology of manufacturing integrated circuits.

Prerequisite: PS 21

Bibliography:

de SA, A., Electronics for Scientists, Prentice Hall, 1992.
Fishbane, Gasiorowicz & Thornton, Physics for Scientists and Engineers (Extended Version) 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1995.
Freedman & Young, University Physics 9th Ed., Reading, Massachusetts: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1996.
Halliday, David & Robert Resnick, Physics, John Wiley & Sons, 1992.
Narciso, Garcia & Arthur Damask, Physics for Computer Science Students, Springer-Verlag, 1991.
Ohanian, H.C., Modern Physics 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1995.

PS 41 Analytical Physics I (5 units)

This course is the first part of a series of three calculus-based introductory physics courses taken by students majoring in science. It aims to develop the student’s analytical and problem-solving skills through rigorous lectures, problem sets, classroom demonstrations, and long examinations. The course covers the fundamental concepts of mechanics and the associated conservation laws. Topics include vectors and their application to physical problems, kinematics motion, dynamics of particles and rigid bodies, energy and momentum conservation, rotational motion, gravitation, fluid mechanics and harmonic motion.

The 1-creditd laboratory complements the lecture part. The laboratory experiments include rediscovery exercises, demonstrations of physical phenomena and problem-based experiments.

Prerequisite: MA 21

Bibliography:

Fishbane, Gasiorowicz & Thornton, Physics for Scientists and Engineers (Extended Version) 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1997.
Halliday, D. & Resnick, R., Physics, John Wiley & Sons, 1992.
Kittel, Knight & Ruderman, Mechanics (Berkeley Physics Course), Vol. 1, New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1965.
Ohanian, H., Modern Physics 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1995.
Serway, Raymond, Physics for Scientists and Engineers 2nd Ed., Saunders.
Young, Hugh D. & Freedman, Roger A., University Physics 9th Ed., Addison Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1996.
***** Tipler, Physics for Scientists & Engineers, 4th Ed., New York Work Publisher, 199.

PS 42 Analytical Physics II (5 units)

This course is the second part of a series of three calculus-based introductory Physics courses taken by students majoring in science. It aims to develop the student’s analytical and problem solving skills through lectures, class recitations, problem sets and long examinations. It covers the fundamental concepts of Temperature, Heat & Thermodynamics, Mechanical Waves, Electrostatics and Direct Current Circuits.

The 1-credit laboratory complements the lecture part. The laboratory experiments include rediscovery exercises, demonstrations of physical phenomena and problem-based experiments.

Prerequisite: PS 41/31

Bibliography:

Physics,4th ed. by Paul A. Tipler
University Physics, 10th ed. by Hugh D. Young & Roger Freedman
Physics, Principles with Applications, 5th ed., by Douglas C. Giancolli
Physics for Scientists and Engineers, 2nd Ed., by Raymond Serway.
Physics by D. Halliday and R. Resnick.

PS 43 Analytical Physics III (5 units)

This course is the third part of a series of three calculus-based introductory Physics courses taken by students majoring in science. It aims to develop the student’s analytical and problem solving skills through take-home problem sets, class recitations, long exams, and lectures. It covers the fundamental concepts of Magnetism, Optics. Topics include Magnetic Field and its Sources, Magnetic Induction, AC circuits, Maxwell’s Equations and Electromagnetic Waves, Geometrical and Physical Optics.

The 1-credit laboratory experiments include rediscovery exercises, demonstrations of physical phenomena and problem-based experiments.

Prerequisite: PS 41/31
Bibliography:

Fishbane, Gasiorowicz & Thornton, Physics for Scientists and Engineers (Extended Version) 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1997.
Halliday, D. & Resnick, R., Physics, John Wiley & Sons, 1992.
Ohanian, H., Modern Physics 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1995.
Purcell, Edward M., Electricity and Magnetism (Berkeley Physics Course), Vol. 2, New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1965.
Serway, Raymond, Physics for Scientists and Engineers 2nd Ed., Saunders.
Young, Hugh D. & Freedman, Roger A., University Physics 9th Ed., Addison Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1996.

PS 101 Classical Mechanics I (3 units)

This course is the first of a two-part junior level classical mechanics course for students majoring in Physics. It aims to further develop the student’s comprehension of the dynamics of particles and systems. It includes discussions on harmonic oscillators, non-linear oscillators, central-force motion, gravitation and potential energy. Other topics included are non-inertial frames, waves in continuous media and fluid mechanics.

Prerequisite: PS 122 or EngMa 101

Bibliography:

Barger & Olsson, Classical Mechanics: A Modern Perspective 2nd Ed., McGraw-Hill, 1995.
Brace, Fowles & Cassiday, Analytical Mechanics 5th Ed., College Publishers, 1993.
Chorin & Marsden, A Mathematical Introduction to Fluid Mechanics, New York: Springer Verlag, 1993.
Landau, L. D. & Lifschitz, E. M., Mechanics 5th Ed., Pergamon Press, 1990.
Symon, Keith, Mechanics 5th Ed., Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1990.

PS 102 Classical Mechanics II (3 units)

This course is the second of a two-part junior level classical mechanics course for students majoring in Physics. This course introduces the students to the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms, rotational motion of rigid bodies, and theory of oscillation and waves. Topics included are: variational calculus and extremization of functionals, the Euler-Lagrange equations, constraints, and configuration spaces; Legendre transformation, Hamilton’s principle, the Hamiltonian and Hamilton’s canonical equations, cyclic variables and conservation of momenta, the phase space and the 1-parameter group of transformations and Liouville’s Theorem; the inertia tensor and angular momentum of rigid bodies, Euler angles and Euler’s equations for rigid bodies, force-free rotations and stability questions; coupled oscillations and normal modes, vibrating strings, one-dimensional waves, the wave equation and its solution, phase and group velocities and energy propagation, reflected and transmitted waves and standing waves.

Prerequisite: PS 101

Bibliography:

Betts, Turner, Introductory Statistical Mechanics, 1992.
Goldstein, Herbert, Classical Mechanics 2nd Ed., 1990.
Kossler, W. J. & Greer, A. J., Classical Mechanics with Maple, 1995.
Olsson, Vernon & Berger, Classical Mechanics: A Modern Perspective 2nd Ed., McGraw-Hill, 1995.
Parisi & Giogio, Statistical Field Theory, 1990.

PS 113 Introductory Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics (3 units)

This is a lecture course covering the basic theories and applications of statistical thermodynamics. It is intended for junior or senior physics and engineering majors. The emphasis is on the development of the theory from a microscopic viewpoint. Taken together with the statistical postulates, it shows how the results of macroscopic thermodynamics and kinetic theory are arrived at from the microscopic theory. Modern applications are likewise presented to develop better understanding of the theories. Topics include basic statistical methods, statistical ensembles, applications of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, chemical and phase equilibrium, and quantum statistics.

Prerequisite: PS 42/33, PS 108

Bibliography:

Burshtein, Introduction to Thermodynamics and Kinetic Theory of Matter, Wiley, 1996.
Callen, Thermodynamics and an Introduction to Thermostatistics, Wiley, 1990.
Hudson, Thermodynamics: An Advanced Text for Material Scientist, Wiley, 1996.
Safran, Samuel A., Statistical Thermodynamics of Surfaces, Interfaces and Membranes, Addison-Wesley, 1994.
Stowe, Introduction to Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics, Wiley, 1990.

PS 115 Advanced Physics Laboratory (3 units)

This is a laboratory course on selected topics from the major areas in physics. It is intended for physics and engineering majors who have already completed an introductory calculus-based physics course. It aims to provide the students with the methods and procedures of experimental physics at an advanced level, and to familiarize the students with the design of modern research equipment and its use. The students perform complete experiments that not only demonstrate established principles but also develop research aptitudes by providing a broad experience in experimental work. Topics include experiments on quantization, simple quantum mechanical systems, spectroscopy, nuclear physics and laser physics.

Prerequisite: PS 42/33

Bibliography:

Bentley, Principles of Measurement Systems 3rd Ed., Longman Group, UK Ltd., 1995.
Dunlap, R. A., Experimental Physics: Modern Methods, Oxford University Press, 1990.
Ibach & Luth, Solid State Physics: An Introduction to Principle of Material Science, Springer, 1995.
Jones, R. V., Instruments & Experiences, Papers on Measurement and Instrument Design, John Wiley & Sons, 1990.
Poon, T. C. & Barnerjee, P., Principles of Applied Optics, Akson Associates Inc., 1991.

PS 116.1/.2/.3/.4 Research Laboratory Series (3 units)
This course exposes students to advanced research techniques in the laboratory.

Prerequisite: none

PS 118 Introduction to Solid State Physics (3 units)
This course introduces students to topics such as crystal structure, reciprocal lattice, phonons, free electron gas, energy bands, semiconductor crystals, Fermi surfaces and metals, plasmons, polaritons, polarons, optical processes and excitons.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

Ashcroft, Neil W. & Mermin, N. D., Solid State Physics, Philadelphia: Saunders, 1976.
Ibach, Harald & Luth, Hans, Solid-State Physics: An Introduction to Principles of Materials Science 2nd Ed., Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 1995.
Kittel, C., Introduction to Solid State Physics 7th Ed., John Wiley & Sons, 1995. (Chapters 1 to 7)
Mihaly, Laszlo & Martin, Michael C., Solid State Physics: Problems and Solutions, Wiley, 1997.
Myers, H. P., Introductory Solid State Physics, London: Taylor & Francis, 1990.
Pettifor, David, Bonding and Structure of Molecules and Solids, New York: Oxford University Press Inc., 1995.

PS 121 Mathematical Physics I (3 units)

This course aims to equip students with the necessary knowledge in vector calculus and linear algebra needed in tackling upper level physics courses. The topics include algebra and geometry of three dimensional vectors; dot and cross products; scalar and vector fields; Frenet’s formulas; gradient, divergence and curl of a vector field; coordinate transformations; line, surface and volume integrals; Stoke’s theorem; the divergence theorem; applications to mechanics and electromagnetics; algebra of matrices; matrix inversion; determinants; systems of linear equations; Cramer’s rule; elementary row operations; linear transformations; eigenvalues and eigenfunctions, diagonalization; and an introduction to tensor analysis.

Prerequisite: MA 22, PS 43/32
Bibliography:
Arfken, George, Mathematical Methods for Physics 4th Ed., 1996.
Friedberg, S. H., Insel, A. J. & Spence, L. E., Linear Algebra 3rd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1997.
Kolman, B., Elementary Linear Algebra 6th Ed., USA: Prentice Hall, 1996.
Kreyszig, E., Advanced Engineering Mathematics 8th Ed., New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1998.
Landesman, E. M. & Hestenes, M. R., Linear Algebra for Mathematics, Science and Engineering, Prentice Hall, 1992.
Leon, S. J., Linear Algebra with Applications 4th Ed., Singapore: Prentice Hall, 1994.

PS 122 Mathematical Physics II (3 units)

This course aims to equip students with the necessary knowledge in differential equations needed in tackling upper level physics courses. The topics include first order and higher order differential equations; integrating factors; homogeneous and non-homogeneous equations; series solutions to differential equations; power series; Taylor series; differential operations; Laplace transforms; transforms of derivatives and integrals, differentiation and integration of transforms, convolution; partial fractions, systems of differential equations; applications to mechanics and electromagnetics.

Prerequisite: MA 22, PS 43/32

Bibliography:

Arfken, George, Mathematical Methods for Physics 4th Ed., 1996.
Bugl, P., Models, Matrices and Differential Equations, Prentice Hall, 1994.
Davis, P. W., Differential Equations with Applications for Mathematics, Science and Engineering, Prentice Hall, 1992.
Edwards, C. H. Jr. & Penney, D. E., Elementary Differential Equations with Boundary Value Problems 3rd Ed., USA: Prentice Hall, 1993.
Hand, E. & Choi, K., Methods of Engineering Mathematics, USA: Prentice Hall, 1993.
Kreyszig, E., Advanced Engineering Mathematics 8th Ed., John Wiley & Sons, 1998.
Rainville, E. D., Bedient, P. E. & Bedient, R. E., Elementary Differential Equations 8th Ed., Prentice Hall, 1997.

PS 123 Mathematical Physics III (3 units)

This is a 3-unit course which aims to equip students with the necessary knowledge in using special functions for solving certain Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations. Emphasis is also place on Orthogonal Polynomials and Vector Spaces. Topics include Metric Spaces, Orthogonalization, Scalars and Tensors, the Lebesgue Integral, the Fourier Transform and Boundary Value Problems.

Prerequisite: PS 121, PS 122

Bibliography:

Dennery, P & Krzywicki, A., Mathematics for Physicists, Harper & Row.
Kreyszig, Erwin, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, New York :Wiley
Arfken,George, Mathematical Methods for Physicists, Academic Press.
Kyrala, A., Theoretical Physics, W.B. Saunders
Boas, Mary L., Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences, New York :Wiley
Hang, E. & Choi, K., Methods of Engineering Mathematics, Prentice Hall, 1993.
Kreyszig, E., Advanced Engineering Mathematics 8th Ed., New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1998.
Lam, C. Y., Applied Numerical Methods for PDE’s, Prentice Hall, 1994.
Pannel, David J., Introduction to Practical Linear Programming, 1997.
Staff, E. B. & Snider, A. D., Fundamental of Complex Analysis for Mathematics, Science and Engineering 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1993.
Strauss, Partial Differential Equations, 1992.

PS 125 Numerical Analysis (3 units)

This course aims to equip students with the necessary background to understand experimental data, approximate functions, approximate solutions to differential equations, solve systems of equations and handle issues related to numerical calculations. This involves some computer programming and/or the use of computational software. The topics include sources of error in numerical problem solving, curve fitting, numerical integration and differentiation, function approximation, numerical solutions of non-linear equations, linear systems of equations, numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations, systems of ordinary differential equations and partial differential equations.

Prerequisites: CE 21, PS 121, PS 122

Bibliography:

Allen III, M. & Isaacson E.L., Numerical Analysis for Applied Science, 1997.
Ayyub, B.M. & McCuen, R.H., Numerical Methods for Engineers, USA: Prentice Hall, 1995.
Celia, M.A., Numerical Methods for Differential Equations, Prentice Hall, 1995.
Lindfield, G. & Penny, J., Numerical Methods Using MATLAB, UK: Ellis Horwood, 1994.
Matthews, J.H., Numerical Methods for Mathematics, Science and Engineering, USA: Prentice Hall, 1992.

PS 133 Optoelectronics (3 units)

This course introduces the students to optoelectronic devices and their applications. It serves as a link between electronics and optics. There is a brief review of geometrical optics, electromagnetic radiation theory and physical optics. It covers elements of solid-state physics; optoelectronic semiconductor devices; semiconductor laser diode and basic laser theory; photo-detectors; dielectric waveguides and integrated optics; modulation of light. It also discusses applications like liquid crystal displays, fiber optic communication systems, fiber optic sensors and actuators.
Prerequisite: PS 41/31, 42/33 & 43/32
Bibliography:
Dragoman, D., Advanced Optoelectronic Devices, Springer, 1998.
Udd, Fiber Optic Sensors, Wiley, 1991.
Uiga, E., Optoelectronics, Prentice Hall, 1995.

PS 140 Electronics (5 units)

This course introduces the students to analog and digital electronics. It serves as a background for computer organization and computer hardware system for computer science majors. It covers electrical circuit concepts, electronic devices such as diodes, transistors and operational amplifiers. It also discusses basic digital electronics including basic combinational circuits with a bit of Boolean algebra and K-maps.

Prerequisite: MA 18, PS 21
Bibliography:
Boylestad & Nashelsky, Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory, Prentice Hall, 1991.
Johnson, D.E., Johnson, J.R. & Hilburn J.L., Electric Circuit Analysis 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1992
Nise, Control Systems Engineering.
Phillips, C.L. & Harbor, R.D., Feedback Control Systems 3rd Ed. Prentice Hall, 1996.
Sedra & Smith, Microelectronic Circuits, Mc Graw Hill Book Company 1990.
Smith, R.J. & Dorf R.C., Circuits, Devices and Systems 5th Ed., John Wiley & Sons, 1990.
Van de Vegte, J., Feedback Control Systems 3rd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1994.

PS 141 Circuits (4 units)

This course covers electric circuit analyses and syntheses, using network theorems & techniques in time, frequency, phase, and s-domains.

Prerequisite: PS 43/32, MA 22

Bibliography:

Carlson, & Gisser, Electrical Engineering Concepts and Applications, Addison-Wesley 1990.
Johnson, Johnson, & Hilburn, Electric Circuits Analysis 2nd Ed., New Jersey: Englewood Cliffs, 1992.
Johnson, Johnson, Hilburn, & Scott, Electric Circuits Analysis 3rd Ed., John Wiley & Sons, 1998.
Millman, & Halkias, Electronic Fundamentals and Applications for Engineers and Scientists, New York: McGraw-Hill, 1976.
Schaum’s Outline Series.
Smith, & Dorf, Circuits, Devices and Systems 5th Ed., Wiley, 1992.

Course Text/References (Laboratory):

Horowitz, Paul and Winfield Hill, The Art of Electronics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1980. (text with laboratory manual)*
Ps 141 Lab Manual.

PS 141.1 Electronics I (lecture) (3 units)

This is a pure lecture course for Computer Engineering (Chemistry) majors that deals with the physics of linear and non-linear circuits. It begins with the study of passive circuits with resistive, capacitive, and inductive elements. This is followed with the study of semiconductor devices like diodes, bipolar junction transistors (BJT), field effect transistors (FET), and operational amplifiers (op-amps) as circuit elements. Emphasis is given on the applications of the aforementioned circuit elements in power supplies, voltage regulators, amplifiers and oscillators.

Prerequisite: PS 43/32, PS 122/ENGMA 101

Bibliography:

Boylestad & Nashelsky, Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory, Prentice Hall, 1991.
Johnson, D. E., Johnson, J. R. & Hilburn, J. L., Electric Circuit Analysis 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1992.
Malvino, Electronic Principles 6th Ed.
Mano, Morris, Digital Design, Prentice Hall, 1997.
Millman, Jacob & Christos C. Halkias, Electronic Fundamentals and Applications for Engineers and Scientists, New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., 1976.
Nise, Control Systems Engineering.
Phillips, C. L. & Harbor, R. D., Feedback Control Systems 3rd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1996.
Sedra & Smith, Microelectronic Circuits, McGraw Hill Book Co., 1990.
Smith, R. J. & Dorf, R. C., Circuits, Devices and Systems 5th Ed., John Wiley and Sons, 1990.
Taub, H., Digital Circuits and Microprocessors.
Van de Vegte, J., Feedback Control Systems 3rd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1994.

PS 142 Electronics II (4 units)
This introductory electronic course for Physics, Chemistry and Computer Engineering majors introduces the analysis and design of electronic circuits using semiconductor devices. The course includes discussion on the 2-terminal diodes, the bipolar junction transistors, the field-effect transistors, operating amplifiers, thyristors and other miscellaneous semiconductor devices.

Prerequisite: PS 141

Bibliography:

Boylestad & Nashelsky, Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory, Prentice Hall, 1991.
Cathey, J.J., Electronic Devices & Circuits, Mc Graw Hill Book Company, 1990.
Johnson, D.E., Johnson, J.R. & Hilburn J.L., Electric Circuit Analysis 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1992
Sedra & Smith, Microelectronic Circuits 4th Ed., New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 1992
Smith, R.J. & Dorf R.C., Circuits, Devices and Systems 5th Ed., John Wiley & Sons, 1990.

PS 142.1 Electronics II (lecture) (3 units)

This introductory electronic course introduces the analysis and design of electronic circuits using semiconductor devices. The course includes discussion on the 2-terminal diodes, the bipolar junction transistors, the field-effect transistors, operating amplifiers, thyristors and other miscellaneous semiconductor devices. This is a pure lecture course for Computer Engineering (Chemistry) majors.

Prerequisite: PS 141.1

Bibliography:

Boylestad & Nashelsky, Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory, Prentice Hall, 1991.
Cathey, J. J., Electronic Devices and Circuits, McGraw Hill Book Co., 1990.
Johnson, D. E., Johnson, J. R. & Hilburn, J. L., Electric Circuit Analysis 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1992.
Sedra & Smith, Microelectronic Circuits 4th Ed., New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 1992.
Smith, R. J. & Dorf, R. C., Circuits, Devices and Systems 5th Ed., John Wiley and Sons, 1990.

PS 153.1/.2/.3/.4 Topics in Environmental Physics Series (3 units)

This may be an open forum type discussion on selected topics in environmental physics under the direction of the faculty in charge.
Prerequisite: none

PS 161 Experimental Optics (lab) (3 units)

This is the laboratory course that compliments the concepts discussed in the Introductory Optics course. It includes selected experiments in geometrical optics such as dispersion and image formation using mirrors and lenses, and experiments in physical optics such as the Fraunhoffer and Fresnel diffraction patterns, interference, and spherical and chromatic aberrations.
Prerequisite: none

PS 162 Introductory Spectroscopy (3 units)

This is a three – unit elective course that discusses the fundamentals of spectroscopy, mainly as a tool for understanding the structure of atoms and molecules from their energy levels. It includes a discussion of the difference between molecular and atomic spectroscopy, the optical theory of the spectrographic equipment, and an analysis of hydrogen and hydrogen – like spectra. It also gives an overview of the different methods of applied spectroscopy such as absorption, emission, raman, and mass spectroscopy.

Prerequisite: PS 108 or equivalent

Bibliography:

Atkins, Physical Chemistry 5th Ed., 1997.
Billing, G. & Mikkelsen, K., Advanced Molecular Dynamics and Chemical Kinetics, Wiley, 1996.
Billing, G. & Mikkelsen, K., Introduction to Molecular Dynamics and Chemical Kinetics, Wiley, 1997.
Diem, Introduction to Modern Vibrational Spectroscopy, Wiley, 1996.
Hollas, High Resolution Spectroscopy 2nd Ed., Wiley, 1998.
Powis Baer Ng, High Resolution Laser Photoionization and Photoelectron Studies, Wiley, 1995.

PS 171 Electromagnetics (3 units)

This course is the first of a two-part undergraduate level electromagnetics course for students majoring in Physics. It aims to further develop the student’s analytical skills acquired in PS 32 by rigorously applying Maxwell’s Equations, vector calculus and differential equations in the analysis of electromagnetic phenomena. Topics are divided into (1) charges as the source of the electric field coupled to polarizable and conducting media with negligible magnetic field, and (2) currents as the source of the magnetic field coupled to magnetizable media with electromagnetic induction generating an electric field. Specific topics include electrostatics and Gauss’s Law, multipole expansions, Poisson’s and Laplace’s equations, solutions to Laplace’s equations in problems with symmetry, method of images electrostatic fields in dielectric media, microscopic theory of dielectrics, electric current, magnetic fields, Biot-Savart’s Law and Ampere’s Law.

Prerequisite: PS 43/32, PS 121

Bibliography:

Freeman & Topan, Introduction to Electromagnetic Fields and Waves, 1990.
Krauss, Electromagnetics 3rd Ed., McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1991.
Milford, Christy & Reitz, Foundations of Electromagnetic Theory 4th Ed., 1993.

PS 172 Electromagnetic Energy Transfer (3 units)
This course is the second of a two-part undergraduate level electromagnetics course for students majoring in Physics. It completes the in-depth discussion of the concepts started in Physics 171, providing the students a broader understanding of the electromagnetic theory, which is the foundation in the various fields of communication, electronics and optics. It provides a rigorous discussion of dynamic electromagnetic radiation including topics on electromagnetic waves and their propagation in vacuum and media, cavity radiation and modes, blackbody radiation, optical radiation, reflection, transmission and interference.

Prerequisite: PS 171 or equivalent

Bibliography:

Borikov & Kiber, Geometrical Theory of Diffraction, 1994.
Freeman & Topan, Introduction to Electromagnetic Fields and Waves, 1990.

Gething, P. J. D., Radio Direction, Finding & Superresolution 2nd Ed., 1991.
Ilyinski, A. S., Slepyman, G. Y. & Slepyman, A. Y., Propagation, Scattering and Dissipation of Electromagnetic Waves, 1993.
Krauss, Electromagnetics 3rd Ed., McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1991.
Milford, Christy & Reitz, Foundations of Electromagnetic Theory 4th Ed., 1993.
Olver, Clarricoals, Kishk & Shafi, Microwave Horns and Feeds, IEEE Press, 1994.

PS 173 Radiation and Optics (3 units)

This course is an advanced discussion of radiation and optics learned in PS 172. It focuses on electromagnetic radiation; free and guided waves; reflection, refraction, dispersion and polarization; geometrical and physical optics derived from Maxwell’s equations; and interference, coherence, diffraction and resolution.

Prerequisite: PS 172

Bibliography:

Born, Max & Wolf, Emil, Principles of Optics: Electromagnetic Theory of Propagation, Interference and
Diffraction of Light 7th Ed., Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.
Ghatak, A. K., Contemporary Optics, Plenum Publishing Corp., 1978.
Hecht, E., Zajac, A. & Guardino, K., Optics 3rd Ed., Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 1997.

PS 175.1/.2/.3/.4 Topics in Photonics Series (3 units)
Selected topics in the field of photonics are discussed in this course under the direction of the faculty in charge.
Prerequisite: none

PS 189.1/.2/.3/.4 Topics in Materials Physics Series (3 units)
The discussion in this course covers topics selected in the area of materials physics under the direction of the faculty in charge.
Prerequisite: none

PS 195 Special Topics (3 units)

This is a three – unit elective course that discusses the current trends and developments in the various fields of physics. It may include the applications of physics in other disciplines such as medicine, biology, chemistry, education, engineering, materials science and environment.

Prerequisite: none

PS 197 Introduction to Quantum Mechanics I (3 units)

This course is designed to give a reasonably comprehensive introduction to the fundamental concepts, mathematical formalism and methodology of quantum mechanics. It aims to provide a characterization of microscopic physical systems in terms of mathematical objects (wave functions, or at a deeper level, vectors in a linear vector space), and a set of rules enabling the information contained in the mathematical representation to be translated into physical terms. The subject is developed starting with this set of rules as postulates. Topics included in this course are Schrodinger’s equation, angular momentum, central forces, approximation methods, radiation and scattering.
Prerequisite: PS 42/33, PS 108

Bibliography:

Gasiorowicz, Stephen, Quantum Physics 2nd Ed., John Wiley & Sons, 1996.
Greiner, Quantum Chromodynamics, Springer, 1997.
Greiner, Quantum Mechanics, An Introduction, Springer, 1996.
Greiner, Quantum Mechanics-Symmetric, Springer, 1997.
Liboff, R., Introductory Quantum Mechanics 2nd Ed., San Francisco: Holden-Day, Inc., 1998.
Sakurai, J. J., Modern Quantum Mechanics, 1994.
Yndurain, Relativistic Quantum Mechanics & Introduction to Field Theory, Springer, 1996.

PS 198 Introduction to Quantum Mechanics II (3 units)

This course discusses perturbation techniques, which serve to generate approximate solutions to the Schrodinger equation. Such solutions appear in the form of an expansion away from known, unperturbed values. Application is made to problems in atomic physics and the problem of an electron in a periodic potential. Topics included are time-independent, non-degenerate perturbation theory, time-independent, degenerate perturbation theory, the Stark effect and the time-dependent perturbation theory.

Prerequisite: PS 197

Bibliography:

Gasiorowicz, Stephen, Quantum Physics 2nd Ed., John Wiley & Sons, 1996.
Greiner, Quantum Chromodynamics, Springer, 1997.
Greiner, Quantum Mechanics, An Introduction, Springer, 1996.
Greiner, Quantum Mechanics-Symmetric, Springer, 1997.
Liboff, R., Introductory Quantum Mechanics 2nd Ed., San Francisco: Holden-Day, Inc., 1998.
Sakurai, J. J., Modern Quantum Mechanics, 1994.
Yndurain, Relativistic Quantum Mechanics & Introduction to Field Theory, Springer, 1996.

PS 199.1/199.2/199.3 Feynman Seminar I/II/III (1 unit)

This course involves a critical discussion of selected topics in physics. It extends over three semesters leading to the completion of a senior physics student project. It provides a venue for the students to apply the various principles and concepts learned from the undergraduate physics courses. The students present a thorough project proposal of a chosen topic, including an approved abstract, preliminary review of literature and timetable. At the end of the course, the project is presented to the department in a thesis defense.

Prerequisite: Junior standing

SCI 10 Science and Society (3 units)

The objective of this course is to present a synthesis of the most significant scientific principles of modern times. It will discuss the impact of science on culture and society and provide a more holistic understanding of the nature of science and technology. The course will also discuss the most significant theories of science. The approach is interdisciplinary and shall cover the various sciences including physics, biology, chemistry, earth and environmental science and their sub-disciplines, such as cosmology, material science and molecular biology.

The course shall consist of lectures and special seminars, readings, discussions, and written and oral papers.

Prerequisite: any two other science courses, including Natural Science courses
Bibliography:

Eddington, Arthur, New Pathways in Science, New York: Macmillan, 1935.
Dyson, Freeman, Disturbing the Universe, New York: Harper and Row, 1979.
Feuer, Lewis, Einstein and the Generations of Science, New York: Basic Books, 1974.
Golob, R., The Almanac of Science and Technology: What’s New and What’s Known, Harcourt Brace Javonavich, 1990.
Goldstein, M., The Experience of Science: An Interdisciplinary Approach, New York: Plenum Press, 1987.
Hatten, J. & Plouffe, P., The Culture of Science: Essays and Issues for Writers, New York: Macmillan, 1993.
Marcel, A. J., Consciousness in Contemporary Science, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993.
McGreal, Ian, Great Thinkers of the Western World, New York: Hayes Collins, 1992.
Pais, Abraham, Inward Bound: Of Matter and Forces in the Physical World, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1986.
Schrödinger, Erwin, What is Life?.

MSE 101: Principles of Engineering Materials I (3 units, lecture)
(co-listed as Ch 141.91)
This course gives an overview of the structure of solids. Thermodynamics of solids: rigorous development of classical thermodynamics as applied to solids, multi-component systems, phase and chemical equilibria, non-ideal systems, surfaces, and defects. Crystallography, defects, diffraction techniques: Phase diagram, microstructure, solids, crystallization, basic x-ray crystallography. Elements of crystal geometry, symmetry, stereographic projections, and reciprocal lattice. Generation, properties, and detection of Xrays. Use of Braggs’s Law in common diffraction techniques for the study of crystals, e.g., crystal orientation, simple structure determination, chemical analysis, and stress measurements.

Prerequisite: Ma 22, Ch 45 or Ps 42 and Ch 7.

MSE 102: Principles of Engineering Materials II (3 units, lecture)
(co-listed as Ch 141.92)

This course provides an overview of the physical, electronic and optical properties of solids. Introduction to mechanical properties of solids, plastic deformation, deformation of amorphous materials, and structure-property analysis. Electrical and magnetic properties of materials: electron transport, properties of junctions, semiconductor devices, magnetic properties of materials. Optical properties and thermal properties. Survey of materials characterization techniques.

Prerequisite: MSE 101.

MSE 106.1 / 106.2 Materials and Testing Laboratory I and II (each 2 units lab and 1 unit lecture)
Fabrication, synthesis and testing of materials in laboratory and practical format, should include topics on structure-property relationships, physical and mechanical properties of metals, ceramics, polymers, and glasses in terms of their atomic structure, molecular or crystal structure and microstructure. Equilibrium phase diagrams. Diffusion, nucleation, and growth structure of steels. dislocations theory and its application to yielding, strain hardening, creep, impact , fatigue, and fracture of crystals. Deformation of polymers. Selected testing of mechanical and thermal properties. Other materials characterization techniques (SEM/TEM, thermaL) and others.

Prerequisites: MSE 102.

MSE 111: Metallic Materials (3 units, lecture)
Physical and mechanical properties of metals and alloys in relation to their structure. Electrical and magnetic properties, cohesion, solid phase transformations. Microstructure control and multistage heat treatments. An introduction to metallurgical engineering: solidification processing, foundry technology and casting design. Welding and joining and the design of weldments. Powder metallurgy: powder production, component design, sintering. Manufacturing methods, quality control and inspection.

Prerequisite: MSE 102.

MSE 121.1: Polymeric Materials (3 units, lecture)
MSE 122.1: Polymeric Materials Laboratory (1 unit)

(co-listed as CH 141.91 and CH 141.92, respectively)
An overview of polymer chemistry and high polymer physics. Topics include: molecular weight and distribution, polymerization reactions and kinetics, solution properties, molecular structure, morphology of amorphous and crystalline polymers, rubber elasticity, visco-elasticity, glass transition, and mechanical testing. Some commercial polymers and those synthesized in the laboratory will be investigated.

Prerequisite: Ch 25 and Ch 26.

MSE 131: Ceramics Materials (3 units, lecture)

Introduction to ceramics: classification and structures of ceramics, clay minerals, silicates and silica. Ceramics processing, solid and liquid phases sintering, pressure sintering, sintering maps. Glass formation and glass ceramics. Properties of ceramic materials: elasticity, plastic deformation, micro-structural dependence of mechanical properties. Thermal, electrical and optical properties. Novel ceramic processing: new non-conventional ceramic fabric ation methods (CVD, sol-gel, etc.); an emphasis on how the properties of the ceramics are dependent on the fabrication route used in their formation. Advanced ceramic applications: the areas of use of advanced ceramics in engineering; an analysis of the reason for the selection of the particular material with respect to its properties (mechanical, electrical, magnetic, optical, etc. Designing with ceramics: general principles of the problems and solutions used in designing with brittle materials.

Prerequisite: MSE 102

MSE 141 Electronic Materials (3 units, lecture)
Theories of electrical conductivity in metals and semiconductors, p-n junctions, optical properties of dielectrics and metals, and conducting polymers. Device applications. Fabrication and characterization techniques.

Prerequisite: MSE 102

MSE 151 Engineering Composites (3 units, lecture)

Introduction to fiber reinforced composites: atomistic basis for design and properties of engineering composites. Prediction of composite strength and toughness related to real material behavior. Preparation, advantages, and limitations of fiber reinforcements, and of polymer, metal, and ceramic matrix composites. Anisotropic continuum representations as well as test and characterization methods.

Prerequisite: MSE 102.

MSE 160: Engineering Management and Economics (3 units, lecture)
(co-listed as ECE 160)
Economic and financial management: mini-macro economic issues, discounted cash flow, net present value. Marketing of technology, quality management: quality assurance, statistical methods. Ethics of professional engineering, legal considerations: OHS, the environment, employer-employee relations, product liability; intellectual property.

Prerequisite: must be at least in senior year.

MSE 161: Engineering Laws, Contracts and Ethics (2 units, lecture)
(co-listed as ECE 161)
Ethics of professional engineering, legal considerations: OHS, the environment, employer-employee relations, product liability; intellectual property.

Prerequisite: must be in senior year

MSE 199.1/199.2: Materials Design/Research Project (3 units per term in final year)
The objective of the course is to allow the students to accomplish independent research and learning on a particular aspect of materials research and engineering. The student will be required to present a proposal (written and oral), work on the project, a final presentation, and final documentation on a selected research problem chosen by the student or assigned by a mentor. The student shall also be required to attend regular research group meetings, present updates, and train on special techniques needed for the implementation of his/her research project.

MSE Electives:
The MSE electives may be chosen in four concentration areas currently being offered at the Ateneo through the Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics, and Computer Science departments. These are topics in Polymers, Semiconductors, Materials Characterization, and Mathematical Modeling and Computer Simulations. In particular, the MSE 18X Series include Special Topics in the following areas:

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