Graduate

PS 200.xx Special Topics (3 units)

This course involves advanced detailed coursework related to the topics of interest of the student and the faculty in charge.

Prerequisite: none

PS 201 Theoretical Mechanics (3 units)

This course introduces the students to non-relativistic classical mechanics. It includes discussions on space and time manifolds; symmetries and Galilean relativity; Newtonian dynamics; the tangent bundle, constraint surfaces and Lagrangian dynamics; Hamiltonian formulation, the canonical equations; rotation and translation of rigid bodies; the symplectic manifold, Hamiltonian flows and canonical transformations; Hamilton-Jacobi method and action-angle variables; linear oscillation, coupled oscillators and continuous media. In line with its aim to provide students with a comprehensive and updated understanding of theoretical mechanics, an introduction to non-linear phenomenon shall also be included.

Prerequisite: PS 101

Bibliography:

Arnold, V., Mathematical Methods of Classical Mechanics 2nd Ed., Springer-Verlag.
Goldstein, Herbert, Classical Mechanics 2nd Ed., Massachusetts: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1980.
Jose, Jorge V. & Saletan, Eugene J., Classical Dynamics: A Contemporary Approach, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.
Marion, Jerry B., Classical Dynamics of Particles and Systems 2nd Ed., New York: Academic Press, 1970.
Scheck, Florian, Mechanics: From Newton’s Laws to Deterministic Chaos, Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 1994.
Schutz, Bernard, Geometrical Methods of Mathematical Physics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995.

PS 205 Mathematical Physics (3 units)

This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive mathematical background to be used in physics. The topics covered are group theory and special functions, modern manifold theoretical approach to mechanics using algebraic geometry and where applicable, geometric algebra/Grassmann algebra.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

Bishop, Richard L. & Crittenden, Richard J., Geometry of Manifolds, New York: Academic Press Inc., 1964.
Georgi, Howard, Lie Algebras in Particle Physics: From Isospin to Unified Theories, Massachusetts: Benjamin/Cummings Publishing Company, Inc., 1982.
Goldstein, Herbert, Classical Mechanics 2nd Ed., Massachusetts: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1980.
Hestenes, David, New Foundations for Classical Mechanics 2nd Ed., Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1999.
Jose, Jorge V. & Saletan, Eugene J., Classical Dynamics: A Contemporary Approach, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.
Marion, Jerry B., Classical Dynamics of Particles and Systems 2nd Ed., New York: Academic Press, 1970.
Martin, Daniel, Manifold Theory: An Introduction for Mathematical Physicists, New York: Ellis Horwood Ltd., 1991.
Scheck, Florian, Mechanics: From Newton’s Laws to Deterministic Chaos, Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 1994.
Schutz, Bernard, Geometrical Methods of Mathematical Physics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995.

PS 208 Quantum Mechanics I (3 units)

This course provides an advanced discussion on the concepts and theories in quantum mechanics such as the Schrodinger equation and its application to various physical problems, spin, perturbation theory, theory of scattering symmetry groups, quantum theory of radiation and introduction to interaction of radiation and matter.

Prerequisite: PS 197

Bibliography:

Cohen-Tannoudji, C., Dui, B. & Laloe, F., Quantum Mechanics, John Wiley & Sons, 1992.
Goswami, Amit, Quantum Mechanics 2nd Ed., WCB/McGraw-Hill, 1996.
Liboff, Richard, Introductory Quantum Mechanics 3rd Ed., Addison-Wesley, 1998.
Louisell, William H., Quantum Statistical Properties of Radiation, New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1990.
Merzbacher, Eugen, Quantum Mechanics 3rd Ed., John Wiley & Sons, 1997.
Sakurai, J. J., Advanced Quantum Mechanics, Massachusetts: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1967.

PS 210 Quantum Mechanics II (3 units)

This course is a further exploration of the concepts of quantum mechanics. It covers selected topics in advanced quantum mechanics for solving Schrodinger’s equation including approximation methods, semiclassical treatment of radiation-matter interaction, application to physical systems and structural foundations of quantum theory.

Prerequisite: PS 197, PS 208

Bibliography:

Bethe, Hans A., Intermediate Quantum Mechanics, New York: W. A. Benjamin, Inc., 1964.
Cohen-Tannoudji, C., Dui, B. & Laloe, F., Quantum Mechanics, John Wiley & Sons, 1992.
Isham, Chris J., Lectures on Quantum Theory: Mathematical and Structural Foundations, London: Imperial College Press, 1997.
Loudon, Rodney, The Quantum Theory of Light, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1973.
Sakurai, J. J., Advanced Quantum Mechanics, Massachusetts: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1967.

PS 211 Fluid Mechanics (3 units)

This course is a study of the physics of continuous matter. Discussions involve an in depth treatment of Navier-Stokes Equations with consideration of turbulence and varying Rayleigh regimes including non-linear phenomenon.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

Batchelor, G. K., An Introduction to Fluid Dynamics (reprinted version), New York: Cambridge University, 1977.
Dutton, J. A., The Ceaseless Wind: An Introduction to the Theory of Atmospheric Motion (reprinted version), New York: Dover, 1986.
Ghil, M., Benzi, R. & Parisi, G., eds., Turbulence and Predictability in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics and Climate Dynamics, Amsterdam: North-Holland, 1985.
Holton, J. R., An Introduction to Dynamic Meteorology, New York: Academic, 1972.
Stommel, H., The Gulf Stream: A Physical and Dynamical Description, California: University of California, Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1960.

PS 212 Statistical Mechanics (3 units)

This course involves a comprehensive discussion on both classical and quantum statistical mechanics. In particular, the topics covered are kinetic theory, transport phenomena, microcanonical, canonical and grand canonical ensembles, application to the ideal Fermi gas and the Bose gas, theory of fluctuations and non-linearities.

Prerequisite: PS 113

Bibliography:

Addis, William P. & Herlin, Melvin, Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics.
Baierlein, Ralph, Thermal Physics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.
Huang, Kerson, Statistical Mechanics 2nd Ed., John Wiley & Sons Ltd., 1987.
Landau, L. D. & Lifshitz, E. M., Statistical Physics, 1958.
Lay, Joachim E., Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics of Matter: An Introductory Survey, New York: Harper & Row Publishers, Inc., 1990.
Mandl, Franz, Statistical Physics 2nd Ed., John Wiley & Sons Ltd., 1988.
Pathria, R. K., Statistical Mechanics 2nd Ed., Butterworth-Heinemann, 1996.
Reichl, Linda, A Modern Course in Statistical Physics 2nd Ed., Wiley-Interscience, 1998.
Reif, Federick, Fundamentals of Statistical and Thermal Physics, New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc., 1965.
Rowley, Richard L., Statistical Mechanics for Thermophysical Property Calculations, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1994.

Physics 213 Introduction to Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (3 units)

This course introduces the physics of the flow of the atmosphere and the ocean. Gravity, friction and the earth’s rotation are presented in the context of conservation equations. Approximate solutions are derived and used to describe typical phenomena.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

Cushman-Roisin, B., 1994: Introduction to Geophysical Fluid Dynamics. Prentice Hall, NJ.
Holton, J. R., 1990: An Introduction to Dynamic Meteorology. 2nd Edition. Academic Press, New
York.

PS 222 Introduction to Solid State Physics (3 units)

This is an introductory course to solid state physics covering crystal structures, reciprocal lattices, crystal binding, lattice vibrations, heat capacity, free electron gas and energy bands.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

Ashcroft, Neil W. & Mermin, N. D., Solid State Physics, Philadelphia: Saunders, 1976.
Ibach, Harald & Luth, Hans, Solid-State Physics: An Introduction to Principles of Materials Science 2nd Ed., Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 1995.
Kittel, C., Introduction to Solid State Physics 7th Ed., John Wiley & Sons, 1995. (Chapters 1 to 7)
Mihaly, Laszlo & Martin, Michael C., Solid State Physics: Problems and Solutions, Wiley, 1997.
Myers, H. P., Introductory Solid State Physics, London: Taylor & Francis, 1990.
Pettifor, David, Bonding and Structure of Molecules and Solids, New York: Oxford University Press Inc., 1995.

PS 223 Physical Theory of the Solid State (3 units)

This is a continuation of PS 222. The topics to be covered are semiconductor crystals, Fermi surfaces and metals, plasmons, polaritons, polarons, excitons, Kramers-Kronig relations, point defects, line defects, surface defects, volume defects and alloys.
Prerequisite: PS 222
Bibliography:
Ashcroft, Neil W. & Mermin, N. D., Solid State Physics, Philadelphia: Saunders, 1976.
Ibach, Harald & Luth, Hans, Solid-State Physics: An Introduction to Principles of Materials Science 2nd Ed., Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 1995.
Kittel, C., Introduction to Solid State Physics 7th Ed., John Wiley & Sons, 1995. (selected topics from Chapters 8 to 21)
Mihaly, Laszlo & Martin, Michael C., Solid State Physics: Problems and Solutions, Wiley, 1997.
Myers, H. P., Introductory Solid State Physics, London: Taylor & Francis, 1990.
Pettifor, David, Bonding and Structure of Molecules and Solids, New York: Oxford University Press Inc., 1995.

PS 224 Electronic Properties of Materials (3 units)

This course discusses and pursues in detail topics related to the electronic properties of materials. The topics include energy band calculations, electrical conduction in metals and semiconductors, density functional calculations and applications to semiconductor devices.

Prerequisite: PS 223

Bibliography:

Boer, Karl W., Survey of Semiconductor Physics, Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1990.
Electronic Properties of Materials 2nd Ed., Springer-Verlag, 1992.
Harrison, Walter A., Electronic Structure and the Properties of Solids: The Physics of the Chemical Bond, New York: Dover Publications Inc., 1989.

PS 225 Thermodynamics and Phase Transformations (3 units)

The topics to be covered in this course are thermodynamics, nucleation, interface motion, mechanisms and kinetics of chemical reactions between solids and their environment, thermodynamic properties of solid solutions, mode for substitutional and interstitial solutions, and calculation of phase diagrams.

Prerequisite: PS 113

Bibliography:

Burshtein, A. I., Introduction to Thermodynamics and Kinetic Theory of Matter, Wiley 1995.
Hudson, Thermodynamics: An Advanced Text for Materials Scientists, Wiley, 1996.
Kondepudi, D., Modern Thermodynamics: From Heat Engines to Dissipative Structures, Wiley, 1998.
McQuarrie, Donald A. & Simon, John D., Molecular Thermodynamics, California: University Science Books, 1999.
Pathria, R. K., Statistical Mechanics (reprinted with corrections), Oxford: Pergamon Press, 1985.
Zemansky, Mark W. & Dittman, Richard H., Heat and Thermodynamics: An Intermediate Textbook 7th Ed., New York: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 1997.
Haug, Hartmut & Koch, S. W., Quantum Theory of the Optical and Electronic Properties of Semiconductors 2nd Ed., Singapore: World Scientific, 1993.
Kittel, C., Introduction to Solid State Physics 7th Ed., John Wiley & Sons, 1995.

PS 226 Materials Characterization (3 units)

This is a survey of destructive and non-destructive materials characterization techniques. The techniques are classified as to whether they test the physical, chemical or electronic properties of materials. Special attention will be devoted to techniques for semiconductors.

Prerequisite: PS 222, PS 223

Bibliography:

Altergott, W. & Henneke, E., eds., Characterisation of Advanced Materials, Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, 1991.
Brandon, D. & Kaplan, Wayne D., Microstructural Characterization of Materials, John Wiley & Son Ltd, 1999.
Flewitt, P. E. J. & Wild, R. K., Physical Methods for Materials Characterisation, Springer, 1994.
Perry, D. L., ed., Applications of Analytical Techniques to the Characterization of Materials, Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, 1992.
Schroder, Dieter K., Semiconductor Material and Device Characterization, New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1990.
Sibilia, John P., A Guide to Materials Characterization and Chemical Analysis 2nd Ed., Vch Pub, 1996.
Stradling, R. A. & Klipstein, P. C., eds., Growth and Characterisation of Semiconductors, Springer, 1990.
Wilson, S., Brundle, C. R. & Evans, C., eds., Encyclopedia of Materials Characterization: Surfaces, Interfaces, Thin Films, Butterworth-Heinemann, 1992.

PS 230 Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (3 units)

This course involves a discussion of the basic concepts of geophysical fluids. The topics covered are dynamical equations in rotating coordinate systems, beta plane approximation, irrotational and non-divergent flows, Boussinesq and quasi-geotrophic approximations, vorticity and divergence equations, and potential vorticity theorem.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

Cushman-Roisin, Benoit, Introduction to Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Prentice Hall, 1994.
Dutton, J. A., Dynamics of Atmospheric Motion, New York: Dover Publications, Inc.
Pedlosky, Joseph, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics 2nd/Rep Ed., Springer Verlag, 1992.
Scorer, R. S., Dynamics of Meteorology and Climate, John Wiley & Sons.

PS 231 Computational Models for the Environment (3 units)

This course introduces students to computer solutions of geophysical fluid problems, atmospheric, oceanic, and hydrological models, as well as numerical solutions of model equations. Students are also given the opportunity for a hands-on experience in running computer models.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

Haltiner, George J. & Williams, Roger T., Numerical Prediction and Dynamic Meteorology 2nd Ed., New York: John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 1980.
Marchuk, G. I., Numerical Methods in Weather Prediction, Academic Press.
Thomann, R. V. & Mueller, J. A., Principles of Surface Water Quality Modeling and Control, Harper and Row Publishers.
Trenberth, K., Climate System Modeling, Cambridge University Press.
Wendt, John F., ed., Computational Fluid Dynamics: An Introduction, Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 1996.

PS 232 Physical Meteorology (3 units)

This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of physical meteorology. Topics include thermodynamics and radiative processes in the atmosphere, first and second laws of thermodynamics, atmospheric statics, adiabatic processes, solar and terrestrial radiation, radiation transfer including absorption, emission and scattering. Radiation and climate are also covered.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

Anthes, Richard A., Meteorology 7th Ed., New Jersey: Prentice-Hall Inc., 1997.
Fleagle, R. G. & Businger, J. A., An Introduction to Atmospheric Physics, Academic Press.
Goody, Richard, Principles of Atmospheric Physics and Chemistry, New York: Oxford University Press Inc., 1995.
Hess, S. L., Introduction to Theoretical Meteorology, Rinehart and Winston.
Wallace & Hobbs.

PS 233 Dynamic Meteorology (3 units)

Dynamic meteorology studies the motions associated with weather and climate. Thus, this course aims to conduct a theoretical analysis of the structure and the behavior of wave disturbances, Rossby and Kelvin waves, barotropic and baroclinic instabilities, energetics of atmospheric systems, wave dispersion and group velocity.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

Haltiner, G. J. & Martin, F. L., Dynamical and Physical Meteorology, McGraw-Hill.
Holton, James R., An Introduction to Dynamic Meteorology, New York: Academic Press Inc., 1972.
Houghton, John T., The Physics of Atmospheres 2nd Ed., Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995.

PS 241 Fundamentals of Air Pollution (3 units)

Faced with the current problems of air pollution, this course aims to understand this phenomenon with a discussion of the principles of transport and dispersion of atmospheric pollutants. Models for point, line and area sources, and large eddy simulation models are also covered. This course also affords students practical experience using computer models.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

Nieuwstadt, F. T. M. & Van Dop, H., Atmospheric Turbulence and Air Pollution Modeling, Reidel.
Pasquill, F., Atmospheric Diffusion, Wiley.
Seinfeld, John H. & Pandis, Spyros (contributor), Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: From Air Pollution to Climate Change, John Wiley & Sons, 1997.
Stern, A. C., Fundamentals of Air Pollution, Academic Press.
Warner, Cecil F., Davis, Wayne T. & Wark, Jr., Kenneth, Air Pollution: Its Origin and Control 3rd Ed., Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 1997.

Ps 242 Physics of the Environment and Climate (3 units)

This course stresses the interrelationship of the components of the environment. The discussion focuses on the environmental changes due to the greenhouse effect, stratospheric ozone depletion, and urban pollution and climate modification. The consequences of these phenomena in relation to climate change and other components of the environment are also relevant topics of the course.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

Guyot, Gerard, Physics of the Environment and Climate, West Sussex: Praxis Publishing Ltd., 1998.
Haughton, J. T. & Co-editors, The Science of Climate Change, Cambridge University Press.
Peixoto, Jose P. & Oort, Abraham H., Physics of Climate, New York: American Institute of Physics Press, 1992.

PS 243 Remote Sensing and Environmental Mapping (3 units)

Students in this course are introduced to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and satellite remote sensing techniques for environmental management. It also covers case studies involving land use change detection, land degradation, urban morphology and emissions mapping.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

Burrough, Peter A. & McDonnell, Rachael A., Principles of Geographical Information Systems, New York: Oxford University Press Inc., 1998.
Campbell, James B., Introduction to Remote Sensing 2nd Ed., Guilford Press, 1996.
Colwell, Robert N., ed., Manual of Remote Sensing: Theory, Instruments and Techniques 2nd Ed., Vol. 1, Virginia: American Society of Photogrammetry, 1983.
Colwell, Robert N., ed., Manual of Remote Sensing: Interpretation and Applications 2nd Ed., Vol. 2, Virginia: American Society of Photogrammetry, 1983.
Elachi, Charles, Introduction to the Physics and Techniques of Remote Sensing, John Wiley & Sons, 1987.
Schowengerdt, Robert A., Techniques for Image Processing and Classification in Remote Sensing, Academic Press, 1983.

Ps 244 Environmental Instrumentation (3 units)

This course deals with the fundamentals of instrumentation for measuring environmental variables. Furthermore, there is a discussion of electronic sensors, optics, lidar, and radar. Concepts of sensitivity, detection limits, accuracy, and time response are significant topics relating to measurement. Processing of observational data and statistical analysis is necessary in the evaluation of results.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

Measures, Raymond M., Laser Remote Sensing: Fundamentals and Applications, John Wiley and Sons Inc., 1984.

PS 256 Experiments in Photonics (Laboratory course) (3 units)

This laboratory course introduces advanced laboratory techniques in photonics. It also includes exposure to instrumentation associated with quantum electronics and modern optics.

Prerequisite: none

PS 257 Optical Manufacturing (3 units)

This is a course of study in optics technology, particularly with reference to the methods used on the shopfloor. It begins with a brief historical review of glass making, fabrication of lenses for telescopes and microscopes, the details of manufacture of glass, optical processing materials and nature of surfacing. Also covered are the basic requirements, design and layout of an optical processing unit, manufacture of large-size optical processing units, and optical components, inspection and testing methods both at the laboratory and the workshop levels and an introduction to fiber optics technology.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

Hradaynath, R., Optical Workshop Technology, New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Limited, 1993.

PS 258 Optical Waveguides (3 units)

This course involves a discussion on the theoretical basis of optical fibers and planar lightwave circuits, an introduction to fundamental analytical waveguide theories, as well as incorporating numerical methods for application. The topics include wave theory of optical waveguides; slab waveguides; rectangular waveguides; optical fibers; dispersion characteristics of step-index fibers; wave theory of graded-index fibers; coupled mode theory, fiber Bragg gratings; optical solitons; Finite Element Method; variational formulation; stress analysis of optical waveguides; Beam Propagation method; finite difference method analysis of planar optical waveguides and Staircase Concatenation method and arrayed-waveguide gratings.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

Cronin, Nigel J., Microwave and Optical Waveguides, Institute of Physics Publishing, 1995.
Kapany, N. S. & Burke, J. J., Optical Waveguides, New York: Academic Press, Inc., 1972.
Koshiba, Masanori, Optical Waveguide Analysis (Advanced Science and Technology Series), 1992.
Koshiba, Masanori, Optical Waveguide Theory by the Finite Element Method, Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, Co-publication with KTK Scientific Publishers, Tokyo, Japan, 1993.
Marsh, John H. & de la Rue, Richard M., Waveguide Optoelectronics (Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute, Glasgow, Scotland, July 30-August 10, 1990), Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1992.
Okamoto, Katsunari, Fundamentals of Optical Waveguides, Academic Press, 2000.
Syms, Richard & Cozens, John, Optical Guided Waves and Devices, Singapore: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1993.
Tamir Theodor, Guided-Wave Optoelectronics, Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 1990.
Young, Matt, Optics and Lasers: Including Fibers and Optical Waveguides (Advanced Texts in Physics) 5th Ed., Springer-Verlag, 2000.

PS 259 Quantum Electronics and Photonic Devices (3 units)

This graduate course introduces the concepts of quantum electronics covering such topics as crystal physics, quantization of lattice vibrations, quantization of electromagnetic fields, pn junctions, heterojunctions, junction diodes, and optoelectronic devices, the propagation of optical beams, optical resonators, laser oscillation and laser systems, scattering and noise in optoelectronic systems.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

Agrawal, G. P. & Boyd, R. W., eds., Contemporary Nonlinear Optics (Quantum Electronics \Endash Principles and Applications, Academic Press, 1992.
Hunsperger, R. G. & Dekker, M., Photonic Devices and Systems.
Marcuse, Dietrich, Principles of Quantum Electronics, New York: Academic Press, Inc., 1980.
Osinski, M., Chua, S. J. & Chichibu, S. F., eds., Design, Fabrication and Characterization of Photonic Devices, Society of Photo-optical Instrumentation Engineers, 1999.
Schubert, M. & Wilhelmi, B., Nonlinear Optics and Quantum Electronics, John Wiley & Sons, 1986.
Suematsu, Y. & Adams, A. R., eds., Handbook of Semiconductor Lasers and Photonics, Chapman & Hall, 1994.
Verdeyen, Joseph T., Laser Electronics 3rd Ed., New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1995.
Yariv, Amnon, Optical Electronics 4th Ed., Philadelphia: Saunders College Publishing, 1991.

PS 260 Geometric Optics and Interference (3 units)

This course covers topics such as foundations of geometrical optics, geometrical theory of imaging, geometrical theory of aberrations, theory of interference & interferometers, theory of diffraction and diffraction theory of aberrations which introduces the student to the concepts of modern optics. From a beginning with the microscopic origins of the linear response and linear pulse propagation with generalized dispersion, the course also examines pulse compression and dispersion compensation in optical systems.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

Born, Max & Wolf, Emil, Principles of Optics: Electromagnetic Theory of Propagation, Interference and Diffraction of Light 7th Ed., Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.
Fowles, Grant R., Introduction to Modern Optics 2nd Ed., Dover Publications, 1989.
Gasvik, Kjell J., Optical Metrology 2nd Ed., West Sussex: John Wiley & Sons Ltd., 1995.
Guenther, B. D., Modern Optics, Horizon House Publishers, 1990.
Guenther, Robert D. & Guenther, B. D., Modern Optics, John Wiley & Sons, 1990.
Levi, Leo, Applied Optics: A Guide to Optical System Design, Vol. 1, New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1968.
Meyer-Arendt, Jurgen R., Introduction to Classical and Modern Optics 4th Ed., New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1995.
Nussbaum, Allen & Phillips, Richard A., Contemporary Optics for Scientists and Engineers, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1976.
Pernick, B. J., ed., Handbook of Modern Optics, Peconic Publication, 1993.

PS 261 Modern Optics (3 units)

This course is a continuation of PS 260. It aims to provide students with an understanding of optics with a discussion on the theory of electromagnetic propagation in anisotropic media, Jones calculus as applied to birefringent systems, electromagnetic propagation in periodic media, electro-optics, parametric amplification & oscillation. It also covers Raman scattering, Brillouin scattering, phase conjugate optics and an introduction to integrated optics. Nonlinear optics such as optics of anisotropic media and the microscopic origins for nonlinear optical response of gases, liquids and solids; harmonic generation and phase matching are discussed. Topics include 3- & 4- wave mixing phenomena; electro-optic, Kerr, Pockels and Faraday effects; self-phase modulation; solition propagation and overview of nonlinear optical materials.

Prerequisite: PS 260

Bibliography:

Fisher, Robert A., ed., Optical Phase Conjugation, New York: Academic Press, Inc., 1983.
Krainov, Vladimir P. & Delone, Nikolai, B., Fundamentals of Nonlinear Optics of Atomic Gases, New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1988.
Mills, D. L., Nonlinear Optics: Basic Concepts, Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 1991.
Schubert, Max & Wilhelmi, Bernd, Nonlinear Optics and Quantum Electronics, New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1986.
Yariv, Amnon, Optical Electronics 4th Ed., Philadelphia: Saunders College Publishing, 1991.

PS 265 Lasers, Spectroscopy and Applications (3 units)

This course begins with an introduction to the interaction of light and matter and laser systems. An in depth discussion on laser spectroscopy includes topics such as optical cooling, trapping of atoms and ions, coherence, pico- and femto-second spectroscopy. Students shall also be exposed to spectroscopic instrumentation and applications of the techniques.

Prerequisite: PS 197

Bibliography:

Andrews, D. L. & Demidov, A. A., eds., An Introduction to Laser Spectroscopy, Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, 1996.
Demtroder, Wolfgang & Inguscio, Massimo, eds., Applied Laser Spectroscopy (Proceedings of a NATO ASI held in San Miniato (Pisa), Italy September 3-15, 1989), Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, 1991.
Demtroder, Wolfgang, Laser Spectroscopy: Basic Concepts and Instrumentation 2nd Ed., Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 1996.
Stenholm, Stig, Foundations of Laser Spectroscopy, New York: John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 1984.

PS 266 Advanced Fiber Devices (3 units)

This course focuses on the development of fiber-based devices for gain, switching, control and sensing. The Raman amplification process, the rare earth doped fiber laser as well as multiplexers, dispersion correcting fibers, speciality fibers, Bragg gratings and the use of fibers as sensors will be covered.

Prerequisite: PS 133

Bibliography:

Bjarklev, Anders, Optical Fiber Amplifiers: Design and System Applications, Massachusetts: Artech House, Inc., 1993.
Culshaw, Brian & Dakin, John, eds., Optical Fiber Sensors: Systems and Applications, Vol. 2, Massachusetts: Artech House, Inc., 1989.
Dakin, John & Culshaw, Brian, eds., Optical Fiber Sensors: Principles and Components, Vol. 1, Massachusetts: Artech House, Inc., 1988.
Digonnet, Michel J. F. & Dekker, Marcel, Rare Earth Doped Fiber Lasers and Amplifiers.
Dyott, Richard B., Elliptical Fiber Waveguides (The Artech House Optoelectronics Library), Massachusetts: Artech House, 1995.
Fiber Optic Sensors: An Introduction for Engineers and Scientists, John Wiley & Sons, 1991.
France, P. W., Optical Fibre Lasers and Amplifiers.
Grattan, K. T. V. & Meggitt, B. T., eds., Optical Fiber Sensor Technology, Vol. 1, Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1994.
Grattan, K. T. V. & Meggitt, B. T., eds., Optical Fiber Sensor Technology: Devices and Technology, Vol. 2, Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1997.
Grattan, K. T. V. & Meggitt, B. T., eds., Optical Fiber Sensor Technology: Applications and Systems, Vol. 3, Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1999.
Grattan, K. T. V. & Meggitt, B. T., eds., Optical Fiber Sensor Technology: Chemical and Environmental Sensing, Vol. 4, Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1999.
Kao, Charles K., Optical Fiber Systems: Technology, Design and Applications, New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc., 1982.
Shimada, S. & Ishio, H., eds., Optical Amplifiers and their Applications, West Sussex: John Wiley and Sons Ltd., 1994.

PS 268 Optical Networks (3 units)

This course is an introduction to system level design and analysis of fiber based long distance communication systems. The topics covered are optical fiber transmission characteristics, optical sources including LEDs and laser diodes, optical amplifiers, optical detectors, overall system design and performance.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

Cheo, Peter K., Fiber Optics and Optoelectronics 2nd Ed., New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1990.
de Marchis, Giancarlo & Roberto Sabella, Optical Networks: Design and Modeling, Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1999.
Hecht, Jeff, Understanding Fiber Optics, Indiana: Sams, 1992.
Hoss, Robert J. & Lacy, Edward A., Fiber Optics 2nd Ed., New Jersey: Prentice-Hall International, Inc., 1993.
Howes, M. J. & Morgan, D. V., eds., Optical Fibre Communications: Devices, Circuits, and Systems, John Wiley and Sons Ltd., 1980.
Keiser, Gerd, Optical Fiber Communications 2nd Ed., New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc., 1991.
Killen, Harold B., Fiber Optic Communications, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1991.
Peng-Jun Wan, Multichannel Optical Networks, Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1999.
Senior, John M., Optical Fiber Communications: Principles and Practice 2nd Ed., New York: Prentice-Hall International Limited, 1992.
Taylor, Henry F., ed., Fiber Optics Communications, Massachusetts: Artech House, Inc., 1983.
Weissman, Yitzak, Optical Network Theory, Massachusetts: Artech House, Inc., 1992.

PS 271 Electrodynamics (3 units)

This course brings the discussion of the concepts taken in PS 171 to a higher level. It also introduces new subjects in electrodynamics. The topics are the microscopic & macroscopic Maxwell equations, electrostatics in vacuum & in dielectrics, stationary currents & magnetostatics, conservation theorems for the electromagnetic field, plane electromagnetic waves, polarization and propagation. Electromagnetic multipole radiation; principles of special relativity, covariant formulation of electrodynamics; radiation from moving charges; bremsstrahlung; classical electron theory; classical radiation and matter interaction are also covered.

Prerequisite: PS 171

Bibliography:

Greiner, Walter, Classical Electrodynamics (Classical Theoretical Physics), Springer Verlag, 1998.
Jackson, John D., Classical Electrodynamics 3rd Ed., John Wiley & Sons, 1999.
Landau, L. D. & Lifshitz, E. M., Mechanics and Electrodynamics, Oxford: Pergamon Press, 1972.
Panofsky, Wolfgang K. H. & Phillips, Melba, Classical Electricity and Magnetism 2nd Ed., Massachusetts: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1962.
Schwinger, Julian S., Deraad, Jr., Lester L., Milton, Kimball A. & Tsai, Wu-yang, Classical Electrodynamics, Perseus Press, 1998.
Vanderlinde, Jack, Classical Electromagnetic Theory, John Wiley & Sons, 1993.

PS 272 Quantum Electrodynamics (3 units)

After taking up a classical look at electrodynamics, this course introduces the theories involved in quantum electrodynamics such as selected topics in quantum theory of radiation, solutions to atomic matter-radiation interaction, multipole radiation and propagation, multiple scattering and laser principles.

Prerequisite: PS 271, PS 208

Bibliography:

Bethe, Hans A., Intermediate Quantum Mechanics, New York: W. A. Benjamin, Inc., 1964.
Cohen-Tannoudji, C., Dupont-Roc, J. & Grynberg, G., Photons and Atoms: Introduction to Quantum Electrodynamics, John Wiley & Sons, 1997.
Feynman, R. P., Quantum Electrodynamics (Advanced Book Classics), Perseus Publishing, 1998.
Feynman, R. P., QED, Princeton University Press, 1988.
Greiner, W., Reinhardt, J. (contributor) & Bromley, D. A., Quantum Electrodynamics (Theoretical Physics, V. 4) 2nd Ed., Springer-Verlag, 1996.
Heitler, W., The Quantum Theory of Radiation 3rd Ed., London: Oxford University Press, 1960.
Isham, Chris J., Lectures on Quantum Theory: Mathematical and Structural Foundations, London: Imperial College Press, 1997.
Loudon, Rodney, The Quantum Theory of Light, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1973.
Sakurai, J. J., Advanced Quantum Mechanics, Massachusetts: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1967.

PS 273 Plasma Physics (3 units)

This course involves an in depth discussion on the properties and physics of plasmas. The topics include plasma properties, macroscopic transport equations, kinematics and dynamics of plasmas, plasma waves, Alfven waves, collision theory, damping, plasma instabilities, pinch effect, acoustic wave amplification, wave propagation in plasma and plasmas in nature.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

B”hm-Vitense, E., Introduction to Stellar Astrophysics, Cambridge University Press.
Goldberg, Howard S. & Scadron, Michael D., Physics of Stellar Evolution and Cosmology, Gordon & Breach.
Hansen, Carl J. & Kawaler, Steven D., Stellar Interiors: Physical Principles, Structure and Evolution, Springer-Verlag.
Ichimaru, S., Basic Principles of Plasma Physics: A Statistical Approach (Frontiers in Physics Lecture Note Series), revised Ed., 1980.
Kippenhahn, Rudolf & Weigert, Alfred, Stellar Structure and Evolution, Springer-Verlag.
Kruer, W., The Physics of Laser Plasma Interactions (Frontiers in Physics Lecture Note Series), 1988.
Ostlie, Dale A., An Introduction to Modern Stellar Astrophysics, Addison-Wesley.
Peebles, P. J. E., Principles of Physical Cosmology, New Jersey, Princeton University Press, 1993.
Shercliff, J. A., A Textbook of Magnetohydrodynamics, London: Pergamon Press Ltd., 1965.
Tajima, T., Computational Plasma Physics (Frontiers in Physics Lecture Note Series), 1989.

PS 280 Astrophysics (3 units)

This course is a study on the nature of stars including stellar atmospheres and interiors with emphasis on radiative transfer and computation. Birth and death processes will be considered with stellar evolution on the main sequence. Pulsating and degenerate stars are briefly mentioned.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

B”hm-Vitense, E., Introduction to Stellar Astrophysics, Cambridge University Press.
Cowley, Charles R., The Theory of Stellar Spectra, New York: Gordon & Breach Science Publishers, 1970.
Goldberg, Howard S. & Scadron, Michael D., Physics of Stellar Evolution and Cosmology, Gordon & Breach.
Hansen, Carl J. & Kawaler, Steven D., Stellar Interiors: Physical Principles, Structure and Evolution, Springer-Verlag.
Jefferies, John T., Spectral Line Formation, Massachusetts: Blaisdell Publishing Company, 1968.
Kippenhahn, Rudolf & Weigert, Alfred, Stellar Structure and Evolution, Springer-Verlag.
Kitchin, Astrophysical Techniques, Institute of Physics Publishing, 1998.
Mihalas, Dimitri, Stellar Atmospheres, San Francisco: W. H. Freeman & Co., 1970.
Ostlie, Dale A., An Introduction to Modern Stellar Astrophysics, Addison-Wesley.
Phillips, A. C., The Physics of Stars 2nd Ed., West Sussex: John Wiley & Sons Ltd., 1999.
Seymour, Cosmic Magnetism, Institute of Physics Publishing.

PS 281 Cosmology (3 units)

This course involves consideration of the Standard Model treating Big Bang and Friedmann Models. General Relativity will be used as the working framework so as to discuss such relativistic phenomena as degenerate stars and Black Holes. Multiverse theories will also be discussed.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

Bergmann, Peter G., Introduction to the Theory of Relativity, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1942.
Berry, Principles of Cosmology and Gravitation, Institute of Physics Publishing, 1989.
Hall & Pulham, General Relativity, Institute of Physics Publishing, 1996.
Kolb, Edward W. & Turner, Michael S., The Early Universe, California: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 1990.
Nakahara, Geometry, Topology and Physics, Institute of Physics Publishing, 1990.

PS 301 Research Seminar I (3 units)

This seminar series allows students to review the current progress in the field of interest.

Prerequisite: none

PS 302 Research Seminar II (3 units)

This seminar series also reviews current advances in the field of interest which may be different from what has been discussed in PS 301.

Prerequisite: none

PS 303 Advanced Research Laboratory I (3 units)

This course engages students in an advanced research, leading to their masteral dissertation.

Prerequisite: none

PS 304 Advanced Research Laboratory II (3 units)

This course aims to provide students the opportunity to pursue their research, which they have started in PS 303, leading to their masteral dissertation.

Prerequisite: PS 303

PS 307 Graduate Seminar (1 unit)

This graduate seminar series emphasizes on library and information service research methods and techniques which will help students in their research and thesis writing.

Prerequisite: none

PS 308.1 Graduate Colloquium (1 unit)

The Graduate Colloquium is an informal discussion of new research and important papers published in the journals of physics. It also provides an opportunity for the presentation of general reviews of new fields of research.

Prerequisite: none

PS 308.2 Graduate Colloquium (1 unit)

The Graduate Colloquium is an informal discussion of new research and important papers published in the journals of physics. It also provides an opportunity for the presentation of general reviews of new fields of research.

Prerequisite: none

PS 309.x Thesis Research/Writing (3 units)

Upon the approval of the thesis proposal, the student shall proceed to conduct his/her thesis research. This two-semester course provides the student the opportunity to write his/her thesis under the direction and guidance of the Thesis Adviser and Thesis Reader.

Prerequisite: completion of core units

PS 309.1 Thesis Research (3 units)

Upon the approval of the thesis proposal, the student shall proceed to conduct his/her thesis research under the direction and guidance of the Thesis Adviser.

Prerequisite: completion of core units

PS 309.2 Thesis Writing (3 units)

This course aims to provide students the opportunity to pursue their research, which they have started in PS 309.1, leading to their doctorate dissertation.

Prerequisite: PS 309.1

PS 310.1 (6 units)

Upon passing the candidacy examination and the approval of the dissertation proposal, the student shall begin to conduct his/her dissertation research under the direction and guidance of the Thesis Adviser.

PS 310.2 (6 units)

He shall begin to conduct his/her dissertation research under the direction and guidance of the Thesis Adviser.

Prerequisite: completion of comprehensive and candidacy examination

PS ED 200.31 General Physics Education I (5 units)

This course is the first part of a series of three general physics courses taken by graduate students, who are mostly, physics educators. It covers the fundamental concepts of mechanics and thermodynamics. Topics include units, physical quantities, vectors and scalars, rectilinear motion, Newton’s laws of motion, work, kinetic and potential energy, momentum and impulse, rotational motion, gravitation, periodic motion, fluid mechanics, temperature, heat, thermal properties of matter and the laws of thermodynamics. The laboratory experiments deal with measurement, force and motion, momentum and impulse, translational and rotational motion, work, power, energy, temperature and heat.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

Fishbane, Gasiorowicz and Thornton, Physics for Scientists and Engineers (Extended Version, 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1997.
Halliday, D. & Resnick, R., Physics, John Wiley & Sons, 1992.
Kittel, Knight & Ruderman, Mechanics (Berkeley Physics Course), Vol. 1, New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1965.
Ohanian, H., Modern Physics 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1995.
Serway, Raymond, Physics for Scientists and Engineers 2nd Ed., Saunders.
Young, Hugh D. & Freedman, Roger A., University Physics 9th Ed., Addison Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1996.

PS ED 200.32 General Physics Education II (5 units)

This course is the second part of a series of three general physics courses taken by graduate students, who are mostly, physics educators. It covers the fundamental concepts of electromagnetism such as electrostatic phenomena, Gauss’ Law and applications, electric potential, basic circuit elements, simple DC and AC circuits, magnetic field sources, electromagnetic induction, Faraday’s Law, Ampere’s Law, and synthesis of Maxwell’s Equations and electromagnetic waves. The laboratory experiments include rediscovery exercises, demonstrations of physical phenomena and problem-based experiments.

Prerequisite: PS ED 200.31

Bibliography:

Fishbane, Gasiorowicz and Thornton, Physics for Scientists and Engineers (Extended Version, 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1997.
Halliday, D. & Resnick, R., Physics, John Wiley & Sons, 1992.
Ohanian, H., Modern Physics 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1995.
Purcell, Edward M., Electricity and Magnetism (Berkeley Physics Course), Vol. 2, New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1965.
Serway, Raymond, Physics for Scientists and Engineers 2nd Ed., Saunders.
Young, Hugh D. & Freedman, Roger A., University Physics 9th Ed., Addison Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1996.

PS ED 200.33 General Physics Education III (5 units)

This course is the third part of a series of three general physics courses taken by graduate students, who are mostly, physics educators. It covers the fundamental concepts of wave mechanics and sound, geometrical and physical optics, as well as an introduction to modern physics. Topics include mechanical waves, wave interference and normal modes, propagation of mechanical and acoustic waves, diffraction, interference and polarization of light, relativity, quantum and kinetic theory, and applications of elementary quantum theory to atomic, molecular and solid state physics.

Prerequisite: PS ED 200.32

Bibliography:

Crawford, Waves and Oscillations (Berkeley Physics Course), Vol. 3, New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1965.
Fishbane, Gasiorowicz and Thornton, Physics for Scientists and Engineers (Extended Version, 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1997.
Halliday, D. & Resnick, R., Physics, John Wiley & Sons, 1992.
Ohanian, H., Modern Physics 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1995.
Serway, R., Moses, C. & Moyer, C., Modern Physics 2nd Ed., Saunders College Publishing, 1997.
Serway, Raymond, Physics for Scientists and Engineers 2nd Ed., Saunders.
Tipler, Physics for Scientists & Engineers, New York: Worth Publishers, 1991.
Young, H. & Freedman, R., University Physics (Extended Version with Modern Physics) 9th Ed., Addison-Wesley Publishing, 1996.

PS ED 201 Classical Mechanics Education (3 units)

This course consists of a rigorous presentation of dynamics making free use of vectors and calculus. Familiarization with the more important demonstration equipment is acquired through experiments and through discussions with the professor. It includes discussions on harmonic oscillators, non-linear oscillators, central-force motion, gravitation and potential energy. Other topics included are non-inertial frames, waves in continuous media and fluid mechanics.

Prerequisite: PS ED 200.31 – .33 or the equivalent

Bibliography:

Barger & Olsson, Classical Mechanics: A Modern Perspective 2nd Ed., McGraw-Hill, 1995.
Brace, Fowles & Cassiday, Analytical Mechanics 5th Ed., College Publishers, 1993.
Chorin & Marsden, A Mathematical Introduction to Fluid Mechanics, New York: Springer Verlag, 1993.
Landau, L. D. & Lifshitz, E. M., Mechanics 5th Ed., Pergamon Press, 1990.
Symon, Keith, Mechanics 5th Ed., Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1990.

PS ED 213 Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics Education (3 units)

This is a lecture course covering the basic theories and applications of statistical thermodynamics. The emphasis is on the development of the theory from a microscopic viewpoint. Taken together with the statistical postulates, it shows how the results of macroscopic thermodynamics and kinetic theory are arrived at from the microscopic theory. Modern applications are likewise presented to develop better understanding of the theories. Topics include basic statistical methods, statistical ensembles, applications of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, chemical and phase equilibrium, and quantum statistics.

Prerequisite: PS ED 208

Bibliography:

Burshtein, Introduction to Thermodynamics and Kinetic Theory of Matter, Wiley, 1996.
Callen, Thermodynamics and an Introduction to Thermostatistics, Wiley, 1990.
Hudson, Thermodynamics: An Advanced Text for Material Scientist, Wiley, 1996.
Safran, Samuel A., Statistical Thermodynamics of Surfaces, Interfaces and Membranes, Addison-Wesley, 1994.
Stowe, Introduction to Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics, Wiley, 1990.

PS ED 208 Modern Physics Education (3 units)

This is a course on the modern theories of physics developed in the early 20th century. It aims to provide a concise explanation of the physical concepts and theories of modern physics. A broad range of current applications and examples are provided to enhance the understanding and appreciation of these theories. Topics include relativity, quantum and kinetic theory, and applications of elementary quantum theory to atomic, molecular and solid state physics.

Prerequisite: PS ED 200.31 – .33 or the equivalent

Bibliography:

Halliday, Resnick, & Krane, Physics, Vol. 2 extended version, John Wiley & Sons, 1992.
Rohlf, J. W. Modern Physics A to Z, John Wiley & Sons, 1994.
Serway, R., Moses, C. & Moyer, C., Modern Physics 2nd Ed., Sanders College Publishing, 1997.
Taylor & Zafiratos, Modern Physics for Scientist & Engineers, New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 1991.
Tipler, Physics for Scientists & Engineers, New York: Worth Publishers, 1991.
Wickmann, Quantum Physics (Berkeley Physics Course), Vol. 4, New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1965.
Young, Hugh & Freedman, Roger, University Press (Extended Version with Modern Physics) 9th Ed., Addison-Wesley Publishing, 1996.

PS ED 209 Modern Physics Education (3 units)

This is a course on the modern theories of physics developed in the early 20th century. It aims to provide a concise explanation of the physical concepts and theories of modern physics. A broad range of current applications and examples are provided to enhance the understanding and appreciation of these theories. Topics include relativity, quantum and kinetic theory, and applications of elementary quantum theory to atomic, molecular and solid state physics.

Prerequisite: PS ED 200.31 – .33 or the equivalent

Bibliography:

Halliday, Resnick, & Krane, Physics, Vol. 2 extended version, John Wiley & Sons, 1992.
Rohlf, J. W. Modern Physics A to Z, John Wiley & Sons, 1994.
Serway, R., Moses, C. & Moyer, C., Modern Physics 2nd Ed., Sanders College Publishing, 1997.
Taylor & Zafiratos, Modern Physics for Scientist & Engineers, New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 1991.
Tipler, Physics for Scientists & Engineers, New York: Worth Publishers, 1991.
Wickmann, Quantum Physics (Berkeley Physics Course), Vol. 4, New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1965.
Young, Hugh & Freedman, Roger, University Press (Extended Version with Modern Physics) 9th Ed., Addison-Wesley Publishing, 1996.

PS ED 213 Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics Education (3 units)

This is a lecture course covering the basic theories and applications of statistical thermodynamics. The emphasis is on the development of the theory from a microscopic viewpoint. Taken together with the statistical postulates, it shows how the results of macroscopic thermodynamics and kinetic theory are arrived at from the microscopic theory. Modern applications are likewise presented to develop better understanding of the theories. Topics include basic statistical methods, statistical ensembles, applications of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, chemical and phase equilibrium, and quantum statistics.

Prerequisite: PS ED 208

Bibliography:

Burshtein, Introduction to Thermodynamics and Kinetic Theory of Matter, Wiley, 1996.
Callen, Thermodynamics and an Introduction to Thermostatistics, Wiley, 1990.
Hudson, Thermodynamics: An Advanced Text for Material Scientist, Wiley, 1996.
Safran, Samuel A., Statistical Thermodynamics of Surfaces, Interfaces and Membranes, Addison-Wesley, 1994.
Stowe, Introduction to Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics, Wiley, 1990.

PSED 215 Advanced Physics Laboratory (3 units)

This is a laboratory course on selected topics from the major areas in physics. It is intended for physics teachers who have already completed an introductory calculus-based physics course. It aims to provide the students with the methods and procedures of experimental physics at an advanced level, and to familiarize the students with the design of modern research equipment and its use. The students perform complete experiments that not only demonstrate established principles but also develop research aptitudes by providing a broad experience in experimental work. Topics include experiments on quantization, simple quantum mechanical systems, spectroscopy, nuclear physics and laser physics.

Prerequisite: PSED 200 series

Bibliography:

Bentley, Principles of Measurement Systems 3rd Ed., Longman Group, UK Ltd., 1995.
Dunlap, R. A., Experimental Physics: Modern Methods, Oxford University Press, 1990.
Ibach & Luth, Solid State Physics: An Introduction to Principle of Material Science, Springer, 1995.
Jones, R. V., Instruments & Experiences, Papers on Measurement and Instrument Design, John Wiley & Sons, 1990.
Poon, T. C. & Barnerjee, P., Principles of Applied Optics, Akson Associates Inc., 1991.

PSED 216.xx Research Laboratory Series (3 units)

This course exposes students to advanced research techniques in the laboratory.

Prerequisite: none

PS ED 223 Mathematical Methods for Physicists I (3 units)
This course acquaints the student with vector calculus and linear algebra used in the teaching of undergraduate physics courses. The topics include algebra and geometry of three dimensional vectors; dot and cross products; scalar and vector fields; Frenet’s formulas; gradient, divergence and curl of a vector field; coordinate transformations; line, surface and volume integrals; Stoke’s theorem; the divergence theorem; applications to mechanics and electromagnetics; algebra of matrices; matrix inversion; determinants; systems of linear equations; Cramer’s rule; elementary row operations; linear transformations; eigenvalues and eigenfunctions, diagonalization; and an introduction to tensor analysis.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

Arfken, George, Mathematical Methods for Physics 4th Ed., 1996.
Friedberg, S. H., Insel, A. J. & Spence, L. E., Linear Algebra 3rd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1997.
Kolman, B., Elementary Linear Algebra 6th Ed., USA: Prentice Hall, 1996.
Kreyszig, E., Advanced Engineering Mathematics 8th Ed., New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1998.
Landesman, E. M. & Hestenes, M. R., Linear Algebra for Mathematics, Science and Engineering, Prentice Hall, 1992.
Leon, S. J., Linear Algebra with Applications 4th Ed., Singapore: Prentice Hall, 1994.

PS ED 224 Mathematical Methods for Physicists II (3 units)

This course acquaints the student with differential equations used in the teaching of undergraduate physics courses. The topics include first order and higher order differential equations; integrating factors; homogeneous and non-homogeneous equations; series solutions to differential equations; power series; Taylor series; differential operations; Laplace transforms; transforms of derivatives and integrals, differentiation and integration of transforms, convolution; partial fractions, systems of differential equations; applications to mechanics and electromagnetics.

Prerequisite: PS ED 223

Bibliography:

Arfken, George, Mathematical Methods for Physics 4th Ed., 1996.
Bugl, P., Models, Matrices and Differential Equations, Prentice Hall, 1994.
Davis, P. W., Differential Equations with Applications for Mathematics, Science and Engineering, Prentice Hall, 1992.
Edwards, C. H. Jr. & Penney, D. E., Elementary Differential Equations with Boundary Value Problems 3rd Ed., USA: Prentice Hall, 1993.
Hand, E. & Choi, K., Methods of Engineering Mathematics, USA: Prentice Hall, 1993.
Kreyszig, E., Advanced Engineering Mathematics 8th Ed., John Wiley & Sons, 1998.
Rainville, E. D., Bedient, P. E. & Bedient, R. E., Elementary Differential Equations 8th Ed., Prentice Hall, 1997.

PSED 226.xx Topics in Materials Physics Series (3 units)

The discussion in this course covers topics selected in the area of materials physics under the direction of the faculty in charge.

Prerequisite: none

PS ED 241 Electronics Education (3 units)

This course is a study, in theory and in practice, of the basic, as well as the more advanced, electrical and electronic equipment often encountered in teaching undergraduate physics. It introduces the students to analog and digital electronics. It covers electrical circuit concepts, electronic devices such as diodes, transistors and operational amplifiers. It also discusses basic digital electronics including basic combinational circuits with a bit of Boolean algebra and K-maps.

Prerequisite: none

Bibliography:

Boylestad & Nashhelsky, Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory, Prentice Hall, 1991.
Johnson, D.E., Johnson, J.R. & Hilburn J.L., Electric Circuit Analysis 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1992.
Nise, Control Systems Engineering.
Phillips, C.L. & Harbor, R.D., Feedback Control Systems 3rd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1996.
Sedra & Smith, Microelectronic Circuits, McGraw Hill Book Company, 1990.
Smith, R.J. & Dorf R.C., Circuits, Devices and Systems 5th Ed., John Wiley & Sons, 1990.
Van de Vegte, J., Feedback Control Systems 3rd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1994.

PSED 242.xx Topics in Environmental Physics Series (3 units)

This is an open forum type discussion on selected topics in environmental physics under the direction of the faculty in charge.

Prerequisite: none

PSED 245 Electronics Education II (4 units)

This introductory electronic course for Physics teachers introduces the analysis and design of electronic circuits using semiconductor devices. The course includes discussion on the 2-terminal diodes, the bipolar junction transistors, the field-effect transistors, operating amplifiers, thyristors and other miscellaneous semiconductor devices.

Prerequisite: PSED 241

Bibliography:

Boylestad & Nashelsky, Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory, Prentice Hall, 1991.
Cathey, J.J., Electronic Devices & Circuits, Mc Graw Hill Book Company, 1990.
Johnson, D.E., Johnson, J.R. & Hilburn J.L., Electric Circuit Analysis 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1992
Sedra & Smith, Microelectronic Circuits 4th Ed., New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 1992
Smith, R.J. & Dorf R.C., Circuits, Devices and Systems 5th Ed., John Wiley & Sons, 1990.

PSED 271 Electromagnetics (3 units)

This course is the first of a two-part teachers’ level electromagnetics course. It aims to further develop skills by rigorously applying Maxwell’s Equations, vector calculus and differential equations in the analysis of electromagnetic phenomena. Topics are divided into (1) charges as the source of the electric field coupled to polarizable and conducting media with negligible magnetic field, and (2) currents as the source of the magnetic field coupled to magnetizable media with electromagnetic induction generating an electric field. Specific topics include electrostatics and Gauss’s Law, multipole expansions, Poisson’s and Laplace’s equations, solutions to Laplace’s equations in problems with symmetry, method of images electrostatic fields in dielectric media, microscopic theory of dielectrics, electric current, magnetic fields, Biot-Savart’s Law and Ampere’s Law.

Prerequisite: PS 43/32, PS 121

Bibliography:

Freeman & Topan, Introduction to Electromagnetic Fields and Waves, 1990.
Krauss, Electromagnetics 3rd Ed., McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1991.
Milford, Christy & Reitz, Foundations of Electromagnetic Theory 4th Ed., 1993.

PSED 272 Electromagnetic Energy Transfer (3 units)

This course is the second of a two-part electromagnetics course for teachers majoring in Physics. It completes the in-depth discussion of the concepts started in PhysicsED 271, providing the students a broader understanding of the electromagnetic theory, which is the foundation in the various fields of communication, electronics and optics. It provides a rigorous discussion of dynamic electromagnetic radiation including topics on electromagnetic waves and their propagation in vacuum and media, cavity radiation and modes, blackbody radiation, optical radiation, reflection, transmission and interference.

Prerequisite: PSED 271 or equivalent

Bibliography:

Borikov & Kiber, Geometrical Theory of Diffraction, 1994.
Freeman & Topan, Introduction to Electromagnetic Fields and Waves, 1990.
Gething, P. J. D., Radio Direction, Finding & Superresolution 2nd Ed., 1991.
Ilyinski, A. S., Slepyman, G. Y. & Slepyman, A. Y., Propagation, Scattering and Dissipation of Electromagnetic Waves, 1993.
Krauss, Electromagnetics 3rd Ed., McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1991.
Milford, Christy & Reitz, Foundations of Electromagnetic Theory 4th Ed., 1993.
Olver, Clarricoals, Kishk & Shafi, Microwave Horns and Feeds, IEEE Press, 1994.

PSED 275.xx Topics in Photonics Series (3 units)

Selected topics in the field of photonics are discussed in this course under the direction of the faculty in charge.

Prerequisite: none

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