Decision support system using near cloud for disaster and risk management: an interview with Dane Ancheta (BS APS-ACS 2017)

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“Design and development of decision support system using near cloud for disaster management and risk reduction” by E. D. Ancheta (right), J. A. Dela Cruz, and A. J. Domingo. Advisory committee: N. Libatique, PhD, G. Tangonan, PhD, D. Solpico, and D. Lagazo. Department of Electronics, Computer and Communications Engineering, Ateneo de Manila University.  Interlinks 13.0 was held last 5 May 2015, 1:00-5:00 p.m., at Convergent Technologies Center (CTC) Rm 413.

by Dane Ancheta and Quirino Sugon Jr

Dane Ancheta is a graduating student of BS Applied Physics and Applied Computer Systems (BS APS-ACS) of the Ateneo de Manila University and is one of the four last BS APS-ACS majors taking this course. After graduating High School from Ateneo de Zamboanga University in 2012, she went on to Ateneo de Manila University on a 100% financial aid scholarship, and a DOST merit scholarship. She worked at Manila Observatory (MO) for her physics thesis entitled “Temporal variability of localized rainfall events in metro manila over 2 years (2013-2014).” She also worked in Ateneo Innovations Center (AIC) for her Applied Computer Systems (ACS) thesis entitled “Design and development of decision support system using near cloud for disaster management and risk reduction.” Her co-workers are April Domingo (BS Computer Engineering) and Jane Dela Cruz (BS Electronics and Communications Engineering). They presented a poster of their work last 5 May 2017 at Interlinks 13.0, an annual research poster exhibition organized by the Ateneo Innovation Center for the School of Science and Engineering (SOSE) of Ateneo de Manila University. The abstract of their poster reads as follows:

In disaster scenarios, the lack of wireless internet or weak cellular network signal poses a very real threat to crucial information gathering and sharing. Using Near Cloud to store, load and upload information, this project has designed and developed decision support nodes that is able to to gather and distribute intelligent information before, during, and after disasters. These nodes are cached in with key information and data needed for disasters, i.e. maps, message reports, and images. The nodes serve as the command and control in early warning and disaster management systems. Key capabilities featured in for the decision support node include: broadcast mode that is broadcasting message via RF, mapping and visualization, data mining, near cloud, and the medical decision support system. A decision support node architecture is then developed and proposed as the main command and control as mobile kiosks. This mobile kiosk architecture is developed with a number of Raspberry Pi 3‘s, each of which are connected to perform and handle one application in a grid pattern.

Below is an interview with Dane Ancheta by Ateneo Physics News:

1. Why did you choose physics?

I could not imagine myself not taking physics.  I chose physics in all colleges that I applied. I don’t want to live my life wondering, “What if I had taken physics?”  

I love science. When I was a little girl, I would watch National Geographic. I’m naturally inquisitive. My teachers were great and supportive, but it was generally my curiosity that drove me to take physics.

2. Can you tell us about your your physics thesis?

I worked at the Manila Observatory for my thesis entitled “Temporal variability of localized rainfall events in metro manila over 2 years (2013-2014)”. My thesis adviser is Dr. James Simpas and Ma’am Genie Lorenzo. The data comes from the, at the time, newly installed dense network of weather stations around Metro Manila. For my thesis, I used at around 24 stations that are at a 5 km radius apart each. Basically, what I did was characterize localized rain events such as thunderstorms and precipitation; bigger events such as monsoons and typhoons are not included. We found out that the most amount of rainfall is experienced in Tayuman, Manila, though Makati City and Quezon City also experience high amounts of rainfall. The probability of rainfall is highest in middle and western Metro Manila, while it is lowest in southeastern Metro Manila. The study characterizes for the first time the areas of likelihood, rainfall and temporal correlation for the localized rain events in Metro Manila. It does not, however, explain such behavior, so we are still looking for an explanation  This work will definitely be continued or taken over.

For this thesis, all data were being sent to Manila Observatory. It is hard work to make sure that the data we are preparing are usable. We don’t get the data “clean”, that is why we have to check if they are healthy or anomalous. The data come from the weather stations that are exposed to the elements. But I did not have to go out as data from these stations were directly received by MO. I used QGIS and a little Python. I had learned many things working on this project.  This August 2017, we shall go to Singapore for the Asia Oceania Geoscience Society ( AOGS) conference. I shall present a poster of my physics thesis there. A good number from the research team is going because we have both the AQD-ITD (Air Quality DynamicsInstrumentation and Technology Development under Dr. Obiminda Cambaliza and Dr. James Simpas) and RCS (Regional Climate Systems under Dr. Narisma) researchers presenting.

3. Can you tell us about our Applied Computer Systems thesis?

In our 5th year, we start working on our ACS thesis under a thesis group with the ECCE (Electronics, Computer, and Communications Engineering) Department. I got involved in Ateneo Innovation Center where I became part of a big research team. On-going projects were laid out and discussed for us. The bigger research team is currently working on Multi-platform ICT Decision Support System UAVs , Vehicle Hubs, Ubiquitous Computing for Disaster Risk Reduction. We settled on the mission control end of the system. There are three of us in the thesis group- April Domingo is from CoE (Computer Engineering) and Jane Dela Cruz is from ECE (Electronics and Communications Engineering). Basically what we do is we receive all information from the responders and UAVs, and develop a system for this flow of information.

In the event of a disaster scenario, communication lines may be cut off due to damages to infrastructure, making information sharing difficult. Information that may be crucial for damage assessment and rescue operation would be lost or would not be transmitted effectively. In the research, we used the near cloud to store, load and upload information, this project has designed and developed decision support nodes that is able to gather and distribute intelligent information before, during, and after disasters.

We built upon the thesis of those who worked on near cloud before us. The previous team used Ionics plug computer, however, since this product was discontinued, we decided to make our own near cloud using Raspberry Pi 3 and terabyte hard drives. Our architecture is as follows: there is a raspberry pi node which serves as a serve/gateway. All other Raspberry Pi units with their corresponding applications are connected to this node. The architecture itself is an enabler: it enables all the applications to run in the same network.

The system also has near cloud capabilities. It acts as a cloud storage, but for a local network. This is done by configuring a Raspberry Pi for hotspot capabilities, while connecting the terabyte hard drive storage to it. Therefore, anyone can connect to the Raspberry Pi network and access all the files stored in the hard drive. Devices such as phones and laptops can access, download or upload (with permissions) files into the hard drive through this network as long as they are connected to the hotspot. The system also has drop box capabilities. This technology will be useful in evacuation centers. Given that communication lines could be cut off and there might not be enough power, it is hard to get information through. But the Raspberry Pi is low maintenance and low power, but powerful enough to make information available for access via the preloaded data in the hard drive. We tried to test this system by connecting about 10 devices, and it can work well in accessing files and streaming videos.

Another capability is our war room display with multiple screens where the interface is shown. This is how it works: responders and UAVs are on the ground send data to the mission control. The communication is done by radio frequency module at 900 MHz, which reach about 5km point to point without walls. If the messages from a responder is being sent, the message will be relayed to the different phones until it reaches mission control. For the responders sending a message to the mission control, the message and location of the responder will show up in the Google Maps API, so it will be easier to visualize where the responders are. This is how information will be received and instructions will be sent out from the mission control.

The most difficult part of the thesis are the times we have to learn the language then and there. We try to solve problems not encountered in class. We used a lot of different languages for different functions, such as C#, HTML, PHP and mySQL. We used Raspbian for the Raspberry pi the Windows 10 IoT (Internet of Things) core, Visual Studio for the interface, PHP for the chatroom, and Google API for the mapping. We have to learn using internet and the kindness of people.

4. Were you under a scholarship?

I am a Financial Aid scholar. Our kind benefactor is a BS APS-CE (Applied Physics / Computer Engineering) graduate and he gives scholarships to students who are pursuing the same course. I am lucky to have a benefactor like that who is passionate about supporting students interested in physics.

I am also a DOST scholar ever since sophomore year. So that makes three or four years. My failure in one class did not impact my scholarship that bad. It had to be put on hold for a time until I passed, but I did eventually get it back. The failure in that class is just a bump. I did study and did well in my other classes, so I did not feel like I was in danger. My QPI was 2.89 even with the failed class. I survived.

5. What are your plans for the future?

I am not sure yet if I want to take engineering or masters. I am thinking of going to China to do my masters, but I still have to consider the requirements, e.g. fixing papers and submissions. I am very nervous, since it is really an open field.  There is no one direct path to go to. There is so much freedom to choose from. So I have not decided yet on what to do.

6. Any parting words to our Physics majors?

The most difficult part of being a BS Physics/Computer Engineering major is the rigor that comes into the work. It is both a difficulty and a blessing. Not everybody undergoes that kind of rigor that is required of physics. We had to learn a lot: even failure is a learning process. I learned to shift focus from just getting good grades to learning something and growing in the course. I did fail one class: Electromagnetics. I try to look on the bright side and say it was not that bad because it pushed me to do better in my studies.

Physics and Computer systems go very well together. As a physicist, it is really important to work with computers and use them for your advantage. It was sad that the course had to be discontinued. We do learn to program using C++ in PS 130 Computational Physics; however I think it is not enough programming for physics. Even if the course does create excellent and competent students, after college they get into web develop or work in IT related fields. Now, there’s no ACS. It is a shame. Programming is so useful.  In today’s age, if you can program, you can hold the world on a string.

Stay curious. Be inquisitive. Never stop asking questions.

 

 

PhD Physics Dissertation Defense: Fluid-enhanced tunable diffraction with elastomer grating by Caironesa Pada

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The Department of Physics of Ateneo de Manila University cordially invites you to a Physics Dissertation Defense:

  • Student name: Caironesa Pada
  • Dissertation title: FLUID-ENHANCED TUNABLE DIFFRACTION WITH AN ELASTOMER GRATING
  • Schedule and venue: 10 May 2017, 4 PM, F-106

DISSERTATION PANEL

  • Dr. Raphael A. Guerrero (Physics), Dissertation Adviser
  • Dr. Percival F. Almoro (UPD), Dissertation Examiner
  • Dr. James Bernard Simpas (Physics), Dissertation Examiner
  • Dr. Maria Obiminda Cambaliza (Physics), Dissertation Reader
  • Dr. Christian Lorenz Mahinay (Physics), Dissertation Reader

ABSTRACT

A tunable diffraction grating shows promise in applications from beam steering to spectroscopy due to the versatility of its design. A diffraction grating made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is replicated using simple soft lithography. Tunable diffraction is accomplished by modifying groove spacing through the application of strain on the elastomeric grating replica. The range of strain-variable diffraction angles is extended by adding a refracting liquid layer to the grating. The scanning of the 1st-order diffraction angles as the grating pitch is tuned is demonstrated when the grating operates in transmission and reflection mode. In transmission mode, using a water layer, the diffraction angle is tuned from 38o to 33.4o with an applied strain of 17.7%. With an equal amount of strain, adding a glycerol layer results in the diffraction angle varying from 38.8o to 34.4o. When the grating operates in reflection mode, with a water layer, effective diffraction angle is 24.85o with 8.86% strain. This is equivalent to the output at an applied mechanical strain of 12.8% of an unmodified grating. The addition of glycerol as a refracting element to the tunable grating yields 27.8o with an applied strain of 8.86%. Without glycerol, this angle can be achieved at a strain level of approximately 14.76%. The addition of liquid layer proves an efficient way to extend the range of the 1st-order diffraction output. The experimental results are accurately described by the combined effects of diffraction by a deformable grating and refraction by a fluid with a curved surface.

PhD Physics Dissertation Defense: Generation of Periodic Beams with a Volume Holographic Axicon by Alvie Asuncion

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The Department of Physics of Ateneo de Manila University cordially invites you to a dissertation defense:

  • Dissertation title: GENERATION OF PERIODIC BEAMS WITH A VOLUME HOLOGRAPHIC AXICON
  • PhD Physics Candidate: Alvie Asuncion
  • Schedule and venue: May 4, 4 PM, F106

Dissertation panel

  • Dr. Raphael A. Guerrero (Physics), Dissertation Adviser
  • Dr. Paul Leonard Atchong C. Hilario (UPD), Dissertation Examiner
  • Dr. Marienette Vega (Physics), Dissertation Examiner
  • Dr. Mikaela Irene D. Fudolig (Physics), Dissertation Reader
  • Dr. Joel T. Maquiling (Physics), Dissertation Reader

Abstract

Superimposed Bessel beams (SBBs), which exhibit periodic behavior along the propagation axis, have been found useful in optical micromanipulation, atom trapping, laser drilling and other applications. The oscillating core diameter of such beams gained attention due to a pre-defined longitudinal pattern, which can be modified by varying certain experimental parameters. In this study, photorefractive volume holography is employed to generate SBBs with tunable periodicity. This is performed by using an axicon-telescope (a-t) system to generate quasi-Bessel beams (QBBs) with different transverse profiles corresponding to different cone angles. The generated QBBs are recorded as a thick hologram in a LiNbO3 photorefractive crystal. Stored holograms were considered as equivalent to a volume holographic axicon that effectively transforms the profile of Gaussian readout beams into QBBs. Retrieved QBBs from the crystal are focused by the original axicon to produce SBBs. Results show that both the QBB profile and the SBB period can be tuned by simply varying the a-t distance d. SBB oscillation periods that range from 4.3 cm to 6.1 cm were obtained. The method presented in this study allows tunability of SBB period through a simple rearrangement of optical elements.

Satellite systems and space development programs: a talk by Prof. Motoi Wada of Doshisha University

 

The Department of Physics of Ateneo de Manila University cordially invites you to

Art of Science and Engineering III: A Talk on Satellite Systems and Space Development Programs

by Prof. Motoi Wada (Applied Physics Laborary, Doshisha University)

  • Date: 16 January 2017
  • Time: 1:00-3:00 p.m.
  • Venue: SOM 211 (John Gokongwei School of Management)

Abstract: The previous talk covered a story of gravitational wave detection. It is a science supported by an advanced technology. We go out to interstellar space this time. There, sophisticated control systems determine trajectories of explorer satellites solving Newtonian mechanics problems that you learn in your classroom. Mathematical formulations visualize images of photon signals in invisible wavelength range from dark deep space. This talk will cover status of space development programs at both USA and Japan

Map:


Related Posts:

AMBER magnetometer installation at MO Davao station and NAMRIA Magnetic Observatory

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Dr. James Simpas, Clint Bennett, and Dr. Endawoke Yizengaw at Manila Observatory (MO). Top right: AMBER sensor surrounded by bamboo fence at MO Davao Station. Bottom right: AMBER box being carried inside MO Solar Research Building.

Two AMBER (African Meridian B-field Education and Research)  magnetometers were installed in the Philippines. The first was installed at Manila Observatory’s Davao station in Matina Hills in 12 February 2016 and the other at the Magnetic Observatory of the Philippine National Mapping and Resource Information Agency (NAMRIA), Muntinlupa in 13 June 2016. The principal investigator of the AMBER project is Dr. Mark Moldwin from the University of Michigan, while the principal investigator of the AMBER expansion project is Dr. Endawoke Yizengaw from the Institute of Scientific Research of Boston College. The installations in the Philippines were led by Dr. James Simpas and Clint Bennett. Dr. James Simpas is an Assistant Professor of the Department of Physics of Ateneo de Manila University and head of Urban Air Quality / Instrumentation Technology Development and   programs (UAQ/ITD) at Manila Observatory. Clint Bennett is an Instructor at the Department of Physics of Ateneo de Manila University, Coordinator of the Philippine MAGDAS (Magnetic Data Acquisition System) Network, and research staff of the Upper Dynamics Program of Manila Observatory.

The AMBER magnetometer network was built by Boston College to gain a more complete global understanding of equatorial ionospheric motions. AMBER magnetometer stations are used to connect the European IMAGE-SAMNET-SEGMA magnetometer arrays to low and dip-equator latitudes, and link up with South African Intermagnet and Antarctic magnetometers in the southern hemisphere. Amber aims to provide complete meridian observation in the region and filling the largest land-based gap in global magnetometer coverage.  The two AMBER installations in the Philippines at Davao and Muntinlupa were funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR).

AMBER (African Meridian B-field Education and Research) Magnetometer Network

Global Equatorial AMBER ()Magnetometer Network

A. Installation in MO-Davao Station

Last 12 February 2016, Dr. Endawoke Yizengaw of Boston College was accompanied by Dr. James B. Simpas, the head of the Instrumentation Technology Division of Manila Observatory, in the installation of an AMBER magnetometer in MO-Davao station at Matina Hills, with the help of MO-Davao staff Efren Morales and Ruel Narisma.

Davao is an important location since through it passes the magnetic dip equator where the geomagnetic field is nearly horizontal and not tilted from the vertical unlike at the poles. Along the magnetic dip equator flows the Equatorial Electrojet (EEJ), which is a narrow ribbon of eastward current that peaks around 1:00 pm local time. During geomagnetic storms, ring currents are also formed in the equatorial region at 3 to 5 times the radius of the earth (about 6,378 km). The EEJ and ring currents generate magnetic fields around them which can be measured by the magnetometers near the equator.

B. Failed Installation at Manila Observatory

Last 9 February 2016, a few days before the AMBER magnetometer was installed at MO-Davao station, Dr. Endawoke Yizengaw met with Clint Bennett, Dr. Quirino Sugon Jr, and Dr. James Simpas at Manila Observatory. Dr. Yizengaw brought with him the box containing the AMBER magnetometer sensor, cable, and logger. But after some tests, the magnetometer data received was too noisy.

Clint Bennett and Dr. James Simpas also tested the magnetometer readings at the Jesuit Residence near the High School area of the Ateneo de Manila University Campus last 24 February 2016. The data was still noisy. They tried to test again 4 days later for about 30 min. The same noise problem. A new location is needed.

C. Installation at Magnetic Observatory of NAMRIA in Muntinlupa

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Clint Bennett and CPO Alex Algaba in front of the MAGDAS magnetometer data logger at the Magnetic Observatory of NAMRIA in Muntinlupa. Top right: Clint Bennett and Ezequiel Manalac of MO unloads the AMBER cables. Bottom right: Henry Nayve and Clint Bennett of MO sets up the internet connection of the AMBER sensor in NAMRIA office.

Last 5 March 2016, Clint Bennett contacted CPO Alex Algaba of the Magnetic Observatory of NAMRIA (National Mapping and Resource Information Authority), and asked permission to install the magnetometer at the observatory in Muntinlupa. A month later, CPO Algaba informed Mr. Bennett that Commodore Jacinto M. Cablayan, Director of the Hydrography Branch of NAMRIA, had obtained the permission from NAMRIA for the installation of the AMBER magnetometer.

NAMRIA was created in 1988 by DENR (Department of Environment and Natural Resources) to “provide the public with mapmaking services and to act as the central mapping agency, depository, and distribution facility for natural resources data in the form of maps, charts, texts, and statistics.” NAMRIA’s Director is Dr. Peter Tiangco who manages four technical branches: (1) Mapping and Geodesy, (2) Hydrography, (3) Resource Data Analysis, and (4) Geospatial Systems Management.

The Hydrography Branch acquires and analyzes hydrographic and oceanographic data for promoting navigational safety and oceanographic research. The outputs are nautical charts, navigational warnings, and tide and current predictions. The hydrography branch also collects 12-month geomagnetic data from magnetometers hosted by NAMRIA, which are part of OHP (Ocean Hemisphere network Project) of the University of Tokyo and the MAGDAS/CPMN (Magnetic Data Acquisition System / Circum-pan Pacific Magnetometer Network) Project of Kyushu University. Now, the hydrography branch also collects 12-month geomagnetic data from the AMBER Netowrk. These data are used together with those from 18 repeat stations all over the country to construct data products such as geomagnetic maps.

Last 14 April 2016, Clint Bennett together with Exequiel Manalac and Dr. Quirino Sugon Jr. visited the NAMRIA Magnetic Observatory in Muntinlupa, bringing with them the AMBER magnetometer set. They were welcomed by CPO Alex Algaba. Because of the length of the magnetometer cable is not long enough, the magnetometer was buried only a few meters from the iron gate, such that whenever the gate is opened or closed, the magnetometer readings jump.

On 13 May 2016, Clint Bennett returned to NAMRIA together with and Henry Nayve and Dr. Quirino Sugon Jr to adjust internet settings of AMBER’s BeagleBone, so that the data would show up in the AMBER website. The set-up was finished about noon.  Then the MO team, together with CPO Alex Algaba, traveled to NAMRIA headquarters in Manila. There they were received by Commodore Jacinto M. Cablayan, Director of the Hydrology Branch of NAMRIA. Clint Bennett and Dr. Quirino Sugon Jr discussed with Commodore Cablayan and his staff the AMBER network, the Manila Observatory, and NAMRIA’s interest in geomagnetic field data. The action step agreed in the meeting was the creation of an MOU between MO and NAMRIA regarding the AMBER installation.

On 13 June 2016, the magnetometer was transferred to its final location, more than 200 m from the iron gate. It’s now in the woods behind magnetometer house, far from vehicular or human traffic.

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Meeting at the NAMRIA Hydroglogy Branch office at Manila. From left to right: CPO Alex Algaba, Eng’r. Dennis Arsenio B. Bringas, Commodore Jacinto M. Cablayan, Clint Bennett, and Dr. Quirino Sugon Jr.